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Hormonal Carcinogenesis IV

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat28510
edited by Jonathan J. Li, Sara A. Li, Antonio Llombart-Bosch. --Boston, MA: Springer Science+Business Media , c2005.
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Online
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Author
Li, Jonathan J
Other Authors
Li, Sara A
Llombart-Bosch, Antonio
Responsibility
edited by Jonathan J. Li, Sara A. Li, Antonio Llombart-Bosch
Place of Publication
Boston, MA
Publisher
Springer Science+Business Media
Date of Publication
c2005
ISBN
9780387237619
Subjects (MeSH)
Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent
Neoplastic Processes
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - etiology
Receptors, Cell Surface - physiology
Subjects (LCSH)
Oncology
Endocrinology 
Cytology
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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The Local Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone System

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat29683
Edward D. Frohlich, Richard N. Re, editors. (2nd ed.) --Boston, MA: Springer-Verlag US , c2009.
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How exciting it is to see a field so well established as the ren- angiotensin system continue to grow and mature. Originally, following the original identification of renin by Tigerstedt and Bergman over 100 years ago, workers in this area spent years attempting to establish its role in experimental and renal hypertension. The early work by Goldblatt, in 1934, demonstrated that the placement of a clip around a renal artery was clearly related to the subsequent development of hypertension. Howev…
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Author
Frohlich, Edward D
Other Authors
International Workshop on the Local Cardiac Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (3rd : 2008 : New Orleans, La.)
Other Authors
Re, Richard N
Responsibility
Edward D. Frohlich, Richard N. Re, editors
Edition
2nd ed.
Place of Publication
Boston, MA
Publisher
Springer-Verlag US
Date of Publication
c2009
ISBN
9781441905284
Subjects (MeSH)
Cardiology - Congresses
Hypertension - metabolism
Receptors, Cell Surface - physiology
Renin-Angiotensin System - physiology
Vacuolar Proton-Translocating ATPases - metabolism
Subjects (LCSH)
Cardiology
Physiology
Abstract
How exciting it is to see a field so well established as the ren- angiotensin system continue to grow and mature. Originally, following the original identification of renin by Tigerstedt and Bergman over 100 years ago, workers in this area spent years attempting to establish its role in experimental and renal hypertension. The early work by Goldblatt, in 1934, demonstrated that the placement of a clip around a renal artery was clearly related to the subsequent development of hypertension. However, it wasn't until the simultaneous finding by two different geographically separated teams, Page, et al, in the United States and Braun-Menendez, et al, in Argentina that the peptide angiotensin was identified. Thus, the rate-limiting enzyme renin was released from the kidney and catalyzed a biochemical cascade which was eventually shown to produce the elevated arterial pressure. Subsequently, many workers contributed to the elucidation of the concept and sequence of angiotensin I1 generation. Thus, the enzyme renin acted upon its protein substrate, produced in the liver, to liberate the decapeptide angiotensin I which, upon circulating through the pulmonary circulation, finally produced the potent octapeptide angiotensin. Several important subsequent findings demonstrated that angiotensin I1 promoted the release of the adrenal corticosteroid from that gland, thereby resulting in a larger system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Further, this system demonstrated a classical biofeedback and the circulating octapeptide was shown to have additional biological activities in organs other than heart, vessels, kidney, adrenals, and even brain.
Contents
1. Are Local Renin–Angiotensin Systems the Focal Points for Understanding Salt Sensitivity in Hypertension? -- 2. Newer Insights into the Biochemical Physiology of the Renin–Angiotensin System: Role of Angiotensin-(1-7), Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2, and Angiotensin-(1-12) -- 3. Renin, Prorenin, and the (Pro)renin Receptor -- 4. Intracellular Accumulation and Nuclear Trafficking of Angiotensin II and the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor -- 5. Pathophysiologic Implications of Cell Swelling in the Failing Heart: Influence of Intracrine and Extracellular Renin–Angiotensin Systems -- 6. Exploiting Rat Genetics to Investigate Hypertensive End-Organ Damage -- 7. Alternative Renin Transcripts and Functions of Cytoplasmatic Renin -- 8. Novel Aspects of the Cardiac Renin–Angiotensin System -- 9. Intracrine Function from Angiotensin to Stem Cells -- 10. Renin Cell Identity and Homeostasis -- 11. Role of Renal Aminopeptidases and Angiotensin Type-2 (AT2) Receptors in Sodium Excretion and Hypertension -- 12. Intrarenal Angiotensin II Augmentation in Hypertension -- 13. Collecting Duct Renin: A Critical Link in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension -- 14. Renin–Angiotensin–Aldosterone System and Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis in Hypertensive Heart Disease -- 15. Upregulation of Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor (agtr2) Attenuates Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation and Enhances Apoptosis in the LDL Receptor Knockout Mice Fed High Cholesterol Diet -- 16. Salt and Heart: RAAS Involvement -- 17. Cardiac Effects of Aldosterone, the Bad, but Is There Also a Good?
Format
e-Book
Location
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