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Opioids for shortness of breath in advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36447
Nova Scotia Health Authority. The INSPIRED COPD Outreach Program™. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2019.
Pamphlet Number
1892
Available Online
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Shortness of breath is the most common symptom for patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Over time, shortness of breath can get harder to control. Sometimes standard COPD treatments do not help with shortness of breath enough to give you relief. This can make life harder for you and your family. Opioids (for example, morphine or similar medications) may help. This pamphlet provides information about causes of shortness of breath, how opioids help, kinds of opioids…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. The INSPIRED COPD Outreach Program™
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2019
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Analgesics, Opioid
Dyspnea - therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Lungs--Diseases, Obstructive
Opioids
Dyspnea
Abstract
Shortness of breath is the most common symptom for patients with advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Over time, shortness of breath can get harder to control. Sometimes standard COPD treatments do not help with shortness of breath enough to give you relief. This can make life harder for you and your family. Opioids (for example, morphine or similar medications) may help. This pamphlet provides information about causes of shortness of breath, how opioids help, kinds of opioids used, safety concerns about opioid use, possible side effects, and concerns regarding anxiety and depression.
Responsibility
Prepared by: The INSPIRED COPD Outreach Program™
Pamphlet Number
1892
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Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35944
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1885
Available Online
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Pulmonary (lung) rehabilitation (PR) combines exercise, education, and support to help you improve your overall health and well-being. The PR Program may be right for you if you have a chronic (ongoing) lung disease (like COPD, lung fibrosis, or lung transplant). The PR Program may help with symptoms like shortness of breath or loss of strength that make it harder for you to do daily activities. This pamphlet explains the benefits of PR, what the PR program involves, and how to get started. A l…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Subjects (LCSH)
Lungs--Diseases, Obstructive
Specialty
Respiratory System
Abstract
Pulmonary (lung) rehabilitation (PR) combines exercise, education, and support to help you improve your overall health and well-being. The PR Program may be right for you if you have a chronic (ongoing) lung disease (like COPD, lung fibrosis, or lung transplant). The PR Program may help with symptoms like shortness of breath or loss of strength that make it harder for you to do daily activities. This pamphlet explains the benefits of PR, what the PR program involves, and how to get started. A list of PR Programs across Nova Scotia is provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program
Pamphlet Number
1885
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DASH : Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37545
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
1158
Available Online
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Hypertension (high blood pressure) causes your heart to work harder. This can harm your arteries and vital organs. High blood pressure can cause heart disease, kidney disease, and stroke. If you have high blood pressure, eating healthy, balanced meals and lowering your sodium (salt) intake can help. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension are: high in low fat dairy products, abundant (high) in fruits and vegetables, restricted in sodium (salt), and heart healthy (low in total fat, saturated fat…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Alternate Title
The DASH Diet: Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (14 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Hypertension - diet therapy
Blood Pressure
Subjects (LCSH)
Hypertension
Blood pressure
Salt-free diet
Abstract
Hypertension (high blood pressure) causes your heart to work harder. This can harm your arteries and vital organs. High blood pressure can cause heart disease, kidney disease, and stroke. If you have high blood pressure, eating healthy, balanced meals and lowering your sodium (salt) intake can help. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension are: high in low fat dairy products, abundant (high) in fruits and vegetables, restricted in sodium (salt), and heart healthy (low in total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and trans fat). Best choices and foods to avoid are listed. How to read a food label is provided. Recommended daily serving sizes and additional resources are included.
Notes
Previous title: The DASH Diet: Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
1158
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Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) : Inherited Heart Disease Clinic

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams34670
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Inherited Heart Disease Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
0630
Available Online
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In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), some of your heart muscle is replaced by fat and scar tissue. ARVC usually affects the right side of the heart. The fat and scar tissue dilate (stretch) the right side of your heart. This weakens the heart muscle. This makes it harder for your heart to pump blood out to your body. If your ARVC is very bad, it may cause fluid to build up in your lungs (causing shortness of breath), ankles, or belly (causing swelling). ARVC can also chang…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Inherited Heart Disease Clinic
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([6] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Cardiovascular disorders
Cardiomyopathy
Subjects (LCSH)
Heart--Abnormalities--Patients
Heart--Diseases
Specialty
Cardiovascular system
Abstract
In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), some of your heart muscle is replaced by fat and scar tissue. ARVC usually affects the right side of the heart. The fat and scar tissue dilate (stretch) the right side of your heart. This weakens the heart muscle. This makes it harder for your heart to pump blood out to your body. If your ARVC is very bad, it may cause fluid to build up in your lungs (causing shortness of breath), ankles, or belly (causing swelling). ARVC can also change your heart's electrical activity. This can cause fast heart rhythms. The pamphlet gives the most common cause of ARVC, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Further resources are also given.
Notes
Previous title: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) : Inherited Heart Disease (IHD) Clinic
Responsibility
Prepared by: Inherited Heart Disease Clinic, QEII
Pamphlet Number
0630
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Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) : Inherited Heart Disease Clinic

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams34671
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Inherited Heart Disease Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
0629
Available Online
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In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the heart muscle becomes weak. This makes it harder for the heart to pump blood out to the body. This causes the bottom chambers to dilate (stretch). A weak heart can also cause fluid to build up in your lungs (causing shortness of breath), ankles, or belly (causing swelling). DCM may also change your heart's electrical activity. This can cause fast heart rhythms. The pamphlet gives the causes of DCM, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Further resources also gi…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Inherited Heart Disease Clinic
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([6] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Cardiovascular disorders
Cardiomyopathy
Subjects (LCSH)
Heart--Hypertrophy
Myocardium--Diseases
Specialty
Cardiovascular system
Abstract
In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the heart muscle becomes weak. This makes it harder for the heart to pump blood out to the body. This causes the bottom chambers to dilate (stretch). A weak heart can also cause fluid to build up in your lungs (causing shortness of breath), ankles, or belly (causing swelling). DCM may also change your heart's electrical activity. This can cause fast heart rhythms. The pamphlet gives the causes of DCM, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Further resources also given.
Notes
Previous title: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) : Inherited Heart Disease (IHD) Clinic
Responsibility
Prepared by: Inherited Heart Disease Clinic, QEII
Pamphlet Number
0629
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Alcohol and drug use after an acquired brain injury (ABI)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36600
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Acquired Brain Injury Ambulatory Care Teams. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
2022
Available Online
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An acquired brain injury (ABI) causes you to lose brain cells. This means that the brain cells you have left need to work harder to do the same kinds of activities you did before your injury. Using alcohol and recreational drugs affects how your brain works. If you have an ABI, using alcohol and drugs can have a serious effect on you and your recovery. This pamphlet explains how alcohol and drug use will affect you after an ABI and lists resources for getting help.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Acquired Brain Injury Ambulatory Care Teams
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([2] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Alcohol drinking - adverse effects
Street drugs - adverse effects
Brain Injuries - psychology
Subjects (LCSH)
Alcohol use
Drug use
Brain--Wounds and injuries--Complications
Abstract
An acquired brain injury (ABI) causes you to lose brain cells. This means that the brain cells you have left need to work harder to do the same kinds of activities you did before your injury. Using alcohol and recreational drugs affects how your brain works. If you have an ABI, using alcohol and drugs can have a serious effect on you and your recovery. This pamphlet explains how alcohol and drug use will affect you after an ABI and lists resources for getting help.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Acquired Brain Injury Ambulatory Care Teams
Pamphlet Number
2022
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Immune checkpoint inhibitors : a guide for cancer patients

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams38160
Nova Scotia Health. Cancer Care Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
4040
Available Online
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Immune checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs) (also called immunotherapy) are an important part of treating some types of cancer. CPIs work by helping your own immune system to work harder or smarter to attack cancer cells. This pamphlet explains what your immune system does and how cancer affects it, what CPIs are and whether they are the same as chemotherapy, and what precautions you have to take. Information about side effects and your orange alert card is included. A list of resources for more inform…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health. Cancer Care Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors
Immunotherapy
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Cancer--Immunotherapy
Specialty
Cancer Care
Abstract
Immune checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs) (also called immunotherapy) are an important part of treating some types of cancer. CPIs work by helping your own immune system to work harder or smarter to attack cancer cells. This pamphlet explains what your immune system does and how cancer affects it, what CPIs are and whether they are the same as chemotherapy, and what precautions you have to take. Information about side effects and your orange alert card is included. A list of resources for more information is given.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program; Approved by: Nova Scotia Cancer Education Committee
Pamphlet Number
4040
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7 records – page 1 of 1.