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Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
0094
Available Online
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Tears are made by the lacrimal gland and other tear glands around the eyes. They drain through each punctum into the lacrimal sac, and then into the nose. The puncta are 2 small openings at the nose end of each eyelid. Small silicone (rubber) plugs can be placed into one or both puncta. The plugs block the openings, letting more moisture stay on your eyes to help with dry eyes. If the plugs have openings, they help your tears to drain better. This pamphlet explains what will happen when the pun…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Lacrimal Apparatus--surgery
Subjects (LCSH)
Lacrimal apparatus--Surgery
Specialty
Ophthalmology
Abstract
Tears are made by the lacrimal gland and other tear glands around the eyes. They drain through each punctum into the lacrimal sac, and then into the nose. The puncta are 2 small openings at the nose end of each eyelid. Small silicone (rubber) plugs can be placed into one or both puncta. The plugs block the openings, letting more moisture stay on your eyes to help with dry eyes. If the plugs have openings, they help your tears to drain better. This pamphlet explains what will happen when the punctum plug(s) is put in and after the plug(s) is put in. Contact info for the VG pharmacy is provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Eye Care Centre
Pamphlet Number
0094
Less detail

Things to think about before registering for school (university, community college, or private college)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams38172
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Rehabilitation and Arthritis Center. Occupational Therapy Vocational Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
2335
Available Online
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This pamphlet lists things to think about before registering for school. Topics include: how you will know when you are ready, looking into what you need to get into or apply for a program, how you will pay for school, what to do if you are worried about being able to do school work or go to classes because of physical or cognitive (attention, memory) problems, and whether to go part time or full time, and in person or online. Information about what to do once you get into a program and possibl…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Rehabilitation and Arthritis Center. Occupational Therapy Vocational Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Occupational Therapy
Return to School
Subjects (LCSH)
Occupational therapy
School enrollment
Specialty
Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation
Abstract
This pamphlet lists things to think about before registering for school. Topics include: how you will know when you are ready, looking into what you need to get into or apply for a program, how you will pay for school, what to do if you are worried about being able to do school work or go to classes because of physical or cognitive (attention, memory) problems, and whether to go part time or full time, and in person or online. Information about what to do once you get into a program and possible government funding sources is included.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Rehabilitation and Arthritis Center: Occupational Therapy Vocational Services
Pamphlet Number
2335
Less detail
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Medical Day Unit and Hematology Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
2136
Available Online
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A phlebotomy is done to lower the amount of blood cells in your body. A needle is placed into your vein to let some of your blood drain through a plastic tube and into a bottle. This will make you feel better. This pamphlet explains how a phlebotomy is done, how to get ready for a phlebotomy, and what will happen after the phlebotomy.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Medical Day Unit and Hematology Clinic
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Phlebotomy
Subjects (LCSH)
Phlebotomy
Specialty
Hematology
Abstract
A phlebotomy is done to lower the amount of blood cells in your body. A needle is placed into your vein to let some of your blood drain through a plastic tube and into a bottle. This will make you feel better. This pamphlet explains how a phlebotomy is done, how to get ready for a phlebotomy, and what will happen after the phlebotomy.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Medical Day Unit and Hematology Clinic
Pamphlet Number
2136
Less detail
Nova Scotia Health Authority. CVAD Practice Committee. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1571
Available Online
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A PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) line is a long intravenous (IV) catheter (tube). This IV is placed into a large vein in your arm and threaded into a large vein just above your heart. You may need a PICC line for long-term IV therapy of fluids and medication(s). This pamphlet explains the benefits of having a PICC line, where to go to get a PICC line, how your PICC line will be put in, what will happen after the procedure, the risks of inserting and having a PICC line, and care o…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. CVAD Practice Committee
Alternate Title
Peripherally inserted central catheter line
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (10 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Catheterization, Peripheral
Medications
Subjects (LCSH)
Catheterization
Drugs
Specialty
Medications
Abstract
A PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) line is a long intravenous (IV) catheter (tube). This IV is placed into a large vein in your arm and threaded into a large vein just above your heart. You may need a PICC line for long-term IV therapy of fluids and medication(s). This pamphlet explains the benefits of having a PICC line, where to go to get a PICC line, how your PICC line will be put in, what will happen after the procedure, the risks of inserting and having a PICC line, and care of your PICC line. Symptoms that require you to contact your primary health care provider or call 911 are listed. What to do if the PICC line breaks or is damaged is also included.
Responsibility
Prepared by: CVAD Practice Committee
Pamphlet Number
1571
Less detail

Reducing heartburn : gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37531
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
1424
Available Online
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When you eat, food travels from your mouth to your stomach through a long tube called the esophagus. A muscle called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) joins the esophagus and the stomach. This muscle opens when you swallow to let food and liquids pass into your stomach and stays closed when you are not eating or drinking. If you have GERD, this muscle opens at times when it should be closed, letting small amounts of food and acid from your stomach move back up into your esophagus. This is ca…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (10 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Heartburn
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Subjects (LCSH)
Heartburn
Gastroesophageal reflux
Specialty
Food and Nutrition
Abstract
When you eat, food travels from your mouth to your stomach through a long tube called the esophagus. A muscle called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) joins the esophagus and the stomach. This muscle opens when you swallow to let food and liquids pass into your stomach and stays closed when you are not eating or drinking. If you have GERD, this muscle opens at times when it should be closed, letting small amounts of food and acid from your stomach move back up into your esophagus. This is called reflux. This pamphlet explains the symptoms of GERD, what you can do to help or prevent GERD, what foods can trigger reflux or make it worse, how your primary health care provider can help, and why it is important to control your symptoms. Information on planning meals is included.
Notes
Previous title: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) – Reducing Heartburn
Responsibility
Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
1424
Less detail

Lignes directrices pour s’alimenter sans danger

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37306
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
2175
Available Online
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Certaines personnes ont des problèmes de déglutition (difficulté à avaler). Cela signifie que certains aliments ou liquides peuvent se retrouver dans les voies respiratoires au lieu d'aller dans l'estomac. C'est ce qu'on appelle l'aspiration de corps étrangers. L'aspiration est le mot utilisé lorsque la nourriture ou le liquide « descend au mauvais endroit ». Ce dépliant fournit une liste de signes qui peuvent indiquer des problèmes de déglutition. Des conseils de sécurité pour éviter l'aspirat…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document (8 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Deglutition Disorders - diet therapy
Pneumonia, Aspiration - diet therapy
Pneumonia, Aspiration - prevention and control
Subjects (LCSH)
Deglutition disorders
Asphyxia
Aspiration pneumonia
Specialty
Food and Nutrition
Abstract
Certaines personnes ont des problèmes de déglutition (difficulté à avaler). Cela signifie que certains aliments ou liquides peuvent se retrouver dans les voies respiratoires au lieu d'aller dans l'estomac. C'est ce qu'on appelle l'aspiration de corps étrangers. L'aspiration est le mot utilisé lorsque la nourriture ou le liquide « descend au mauvais endroit ». Ce dépliant fournit une liste de signes qui peuvent indiquer des problèmes de déglutition. Des conseils de sécurité pour éviter l'aspiration (nourriture ou liquide entrant dans les poumons) et l'étouffement y sont proposés.
This is a French translation of the English pamphlet 0527, “Safe Eating Guidelines”. Some people have problems swallowing. This means that some food or liquid may go into your airway instead of your stomach. This is called aspiration. Aspiration is the word used when food or liquid ‘goes down the wrong way’. This pamphlet provides a list of signs that may mean you have swallowing problems. Safety tips to prevent aspiration (food or liquid going into your lungs) and choking are offered.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
2175
Less detail
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Angiography Unit, Nova Scotia Health Authority. Diagnostic Imaging. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
0001
Available Online
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During this special X-ray test, a colourless dye is injected into your blood vessels so that they can be seen on X-ray. An angiogram can be used to X-ray blood vessels in various parts of the body. This pamphlet describes getting ready for the test, how the test is done, and care after the test.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Angiography Unit
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Diagnostic Imaging
Alternate Title
Arteriogram
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Angiography
Blood Vessels
Subjects (LCSH)
Angiography
Blood-vessels
Specialty
Diagnostic Imaging
Abstract
During this special X-ray test, a colourless dye is injected into your blood vessels so that they can be seen on X-ray. An angiogram can be used to X-ray blood vessels in various parts of the body. This pamphlet describes getting ready for the test, how the test is done, and care after the test.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Angiography Unit, Diagnostic Imaging
Pamphlet Number
0001
Less detail

Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams34555
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cardiac Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
0331
Available Online
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This test uses sound waves (ultrasound) to take pictures of your heart. During this test, a flexible tube is passed through your mouth, down your throat, and into your esophagus (swallowing tube that connects your mouth and stomach). There is a special probe on the end of the tube. The pamphlet describes getting ready for the test, how the test is done, and care after the test.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cardiac Services
Alternate Title
TEE
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Heart function tests
Echocardiography
Subjects (LCSH)
Heart function tests
Echocardiography
Specialty
Cardiovascular system
Abstract
This test uses sound waves (ultrasound) to take pictures of your heart. During this test, a flexible tube is passed through your mouth, down your throat, and into your esophagus (swallowing tube that connects your mouth and stomach). There is a special probe on the end of the tube. The pamphlet describes getting ready for the test, how the test is done, and care after the test.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Cardiac Services
Pamphlet Number
0331
Less detail

Nuclear medicine tests

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35314
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Diagnostic Imaging. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2018.
Pamphlet Number
1408
Available Online
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This pamphlet was prepared to give a general overview of nuclear medicine tests. A very small, safe amount of radioactive material (radioisotope) is injected into a vein, swallowed or breathed in before pictures are taken. It covers who will perform the test, how to get ready, how the test is done, and how long the radioisotope will remain in the body. The French version of this pamphlet 1962, "Examens en médecine nucléaire", is also available.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Diagnostic Imaging
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2018
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Diagnostic imaging
Subjects (LCSH)
Diagnostic imaging
Abstract
This pamphlet was prepared to give a general overview of nuclear medicine tests. A very small, safe amount of radioactive material (radioisotope) is injected into a vein, swallowed or breathed in before pictures are taken. It covers who will perform the test, how to get ready, how the test is done, and how long the radioisotope will remain in the body. The French version of this pamphlet 1962, "Examens en médecine nucléaire", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Diagnostic Imaging
Pamphlet Number
1408
Less detail

Foods that may raise your risk of aspiration

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35032
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2024.
Pamphlet Number
0529
Available Online
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Some people have problems swallowing. This means that some food or liquid may go into the airway. This is called aspiration. This pamphlet lists signs that you may have a swallowing problem, foods that can raise your risk of aspiration, and recommendations from your Swallow Team.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2024
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (13 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Pneumonia, Aspiration - diet therapy
Pneumonia, Aspiration - prevention and control
Subjects (LCSH)
Aspiration pneumonia
Abstract
Some people have problems swallowing. This means that some food or liquid may go into the airway. This is called aspiration. This pamphlet lists signs that you may have a swallowing problem, foods that can raise your risk of aspiration, and recommendations from your Swallow Team.
Notes
Previous title: Foods that may increase risk of aspiration
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
0529
Less detail

Intermittent clean catheterization

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37452
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Emergency Department. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
2222
Available Online
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Intermittent catheterization is a way to drain urine (pee) from your bladder at different times. A catheter (thin, hollow tube) is passed through the urethra (short tube where urine from your bladder is moved outside of your body) into the bladder to drain the urine. This pamphlet explains why a catheter may be needed, how to put the catheter in, how to wash your catheter, and things to remember. A list of symptoms that require medical attention is provided.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Emergency Department
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (8 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Catheterization
Subjects (LCSH)
Catheterization
Specialty
Urogenital System
Abstract
Intermittent catheterization is a way to drain urine (pee) from your bladder at different times. A catheter (thin, hollow tube) is passed through the urethra (short tube where urine from your bladder is moved outside of your body) into the bladder to drain the urine. This pamphlet explains why a catheter may be needed, how to put the catheter in, how to wash your catheter, and things to remember. A list of symptoms that require medical attention is provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Emergency Department, QEII
Pamphlet Number
2222
Less detail

Care after sedation

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35695
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Emergency Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
0121
Available Online
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Sedation is a treatment given to lower your pain during a procedure. You will be given medication through an intravenous (I.V.) injected into your vein with a needle. This is done by an Emergency Department (ED) staff member. This pamphlet gives instructions to follow after having sedation, information about medications, and follow-up instructions. A list of symptoms that require a trip to the nearest Emergency Department is included. The French version of this pamphlet 1679, " Précautions à pr…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Emergency Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (4 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Anesthetics
Conscious Sedation
Subjects (LCSH)
Anesthetics
Conscious sedation
Specialty
Emergency
Abstract
Sedation is a treatment given to lower your pain during a procedure. You will be given medication through an intravenous (I.V.) injected into your vein with a needle. This is done by an Emergency Department (ED) staff member. This pamphlet gives instructions to follow after having sedation, information about medications, and follow-up instructions. A list of symptoms that require a trip to the nearest Emergency Department is included. The French version of this pamphlet 1679, " Précautions à prendre après une sédation," is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Emergency Services
Pamphlet Number
0121
Less detail

Therapeutic apheresis

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37583
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Victoria General Site. Apheresis Unit. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
0618
Available Online
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Therapeutic means a treatment, therapy, or drug. Apheresis (a-fe-ree-sis) is the process of removing blood from your body, filtering (removing) something out of the blood, and putting the filtered blood back into your body. Information about common types of apheresis, how apheresis is done, how to get ready for treatment, what will happen at your appointment, and what will happen after the treatment is given. A list of symptoms to watch for after you go home are provided.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Victoria General Site. Apheresis Unit
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Blood Component Removal
Subjects (LCSH)
Hemapheresis
Specialty
Hematology
Abstract
Therapeutic means a treatment, therapy, or drug. Apheresis (a-fe-ree-sis) is the process of removing blood from your body, filtering (removing) something out of the blood, and putting the filtered blood back into your body. Information about common types of apheresis, how apheresis is done, how to get ready for treatment, what will happen at your appointment, and what will happen after the treatment is given. A list of symptoms to watch for after you go home are provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Apheresis Unit, VG site, QEII
Pamphlet Number
0618
Less detail
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Diagnostic Imaging, Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Department of Nephrology. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0229
Available Online
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A fistulogram is a special X-ray. A colourless contrast (X-ray dye) will be injected into your blood vessels using an IV (intravenous line). This dye will help your health care tream see your dialysis access (fistula). The test will take about 15 to 30 minutes. The pamphlet describes getting ready for the X-ray, how the test is done, and care after. Risks and a list of symptoms that require immediate medical attention are given.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Diagnostic Imaging
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Department of Nephrology
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
X-Rays
Fistula
Subjects (LCSH)
X-rays
Fistula
Specialty
Diagnostic Imaging
Nephrology
Abstract
A fistulogram is a special X-ray. A colourless contrast (X-ray dye) will be injected into your blood vessels using an IV (intravenous line). This dye will help your health care tream see your dialysis access (fistula). The test will take about 15 to 30 minutes. The pamphlet describes getting ready for the X-ray, how the test is done, and care after. Risks and a list of symptoms that require immediate medical attention are given.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Diagnostic Imaging Department and the Department of Nephrology
Pamphlet Number
0229
Less detail

Urinary tract infection (UTI)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams34408
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Emergency Department. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0396
Available Online
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Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can happen when bacteria (germs) get into the urinary tract. The urinary tract is made up of your kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. UTIs are not sexually transmitted (partners do not spread the bacteria (germs) to each other). This pamphlet explains the signs of a UTI, how UTIs are treated, what you can do to help, what you can do for pain, and how to lower your chance of infection in the future. Symptoms that require medical assistance are listed.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Emergency Department
Alternate Title
UTI
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (4 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Urinary Tract Infections - prevention & control
Subjects (LCSH)
Urinary tract infections
Specialty
Emergency
Urogenital System
Abstract
Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can happen when bacteria (germs) get into the urinary tract. The urinary tract is made up of your kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. UTIs are not sexually transmitted (partners do not spread the bacteria (germs) to each other). This pamphlet explains the signs of a UTI, how UTIs are treated, what you can do to help, what you can do for pain, and how to lower your chance of infection in the future. Symptoms that require medical assistance are listed.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Emergency Department, QEII
Pamphlet Number
0396
Less detail

Augmentation mammaplasty : care at home

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35456
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Plastic Surgery. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0649
Available Online
View Pamphlet
An augmentation mammaplasty (breast enlargement) is usually done under general anesthetic. This means you will be put to sleep for the surgery. The surgeon will make a pocket between the chest wall and breast tissue. They will then place a saline or a gel implant into this pocket. This pamphlet explains what will happen after your surgery, including how to care for the incision(s), discomfort, and instructions about activity. A list of symptoms that require immediate medical attention is provid…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Plastic Surgery
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Mammaplasty
Postoperative Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Augmentation mammaplasty
Postoperative care
Specialty
Breast disease
Surgery
Abstract
An augmentation mammaplasty (breast enlargement) is usually done under general anesthetic. This means you will be put to sleep for the surgery. The surgeon will make a pocket between the chest wall and breast tissue. They will then place a saline or a gel implant into this pocket. This pamphlet explains what will happen after your surgery, including how to care for the incision(s), discomfort, and instructions about activity. A list of symptoms that require immediate medical attention is provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Plastic Surgery
Pamphlet Number
0649
Less detail

Fistulogram : Cape Breton Regional Hospital

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37586
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cape Breton Regional Hospital. Renal Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
2283
Available Online
View Pamphlet
A fistulogram is a special X-ray. A colourless contrast (X-ray dye) will be injected into your blood vessels using an IV (intravenous line). This dye will help your health care tream see your dialysis access (fistula). The test will take about 15 to 30 minutes. The pamphlet describes getting ready for the X-ray, how the test is done, and care after. Risks and a list of symptoms to watch for are provided.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cape Breton Regional Hospital. Renal Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
X-Rays
Fistula
Subjects (LCSH)
X-rays
Fistula
Specialty
Diagnostic Imaging
Nephrology
Abstract
A fistulogram is a special X-ray. A colourless contrast (X-ray dye) will be injected into your blood vessels using an IV (intravenous line). This dye will help your health care tream see your dialysis access (fistula). The test will take about 15 to 30 minutes. The pamphlet describes getting ready for the X-ray, how the test is done, and care after. Risks and a list of symptoms to watch for are provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Renal Program, Cape Breton Regional Hospital
Pamphlet Number
2283
Less detail

Your kidney transplant

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams34288
Nova Scotia Health. Multi-Organ Transplant Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
0196
Available Online
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Having a kidney transplant is a treatment for kidney failure. Kidney failure is also known as Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). A healthy kidney from one person (the donor) is placed (transplanted) into another person (the recipient). Treatment is usually very successful. This pamphlet explains what to expect when you have a kidney transplant. Topics include getting on the kidney transplant wait list, what to do while you wait for a kidney transplant, what to expect when you get called for a kidney…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health. Multi-Organ Transplant Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (68 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Kidney transplantation
Subjects (LCSH)
Kidneys--Transplantation
Specialty
Nephrology
Abstract
Having a kidney transplant is a treatment for kidney failure. Kidney failure is also known as Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). A healthy kidney from one person (the donor) is placed (transplanted) into another person (the recipient). Treatment is usually very successful. This pamphlet explains what to expect when you have a kidney transplant. Topics include getting on the kidney transplant wait list, what to do while you wait for a kidney transplant, what to expect when you get called for a kidney, your hospital stay, and recovery. Information about staying healthy at home and a list of resources for more information is included. The French version of this pamphlet 1127, "Votre greffe de rein," is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Multi-Organ Transplant Program
Pamphlet Number
0196
Less detail

Repair of a blocked tear duct

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams34383
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
0176
Available Online
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This pamphlet will help you learn how to care for yourself safely after surgery. This surgery is called a dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). It is needed when the tear duct is blocked and tears cannot drain. During the surgery, your surgeon will make a new tear path so that your tears can drain into your nose. The pamphlet explains what will happen before, during, and after your surgery. Topics include pain, how to use a cold compress, your dressing, after care, and follow-up. Symptoms that need medi…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (9 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures
Nasolacrimal Duct
Eye - surgery
Subjects (LCSH)
Eye--Surgery
Specialty
Ophthalmology
Abstract
This pamphlet will help you learn how to care for yourself safely after surgery. This surgery is called a dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). It is needed when the tear duct is blocked and tears cannot drain. During the surgery, your surgeon will make a new tear path so that your tears can drain into your nose. The pamphlet explains what will happen before, during, and after your surgery. Topics include pain, how to use a cold compress, your dressing, after care, and follow-up. Symptoms that need medical attention are listed. The French version of this pamphlet 2097, "Intervention pour débloquer les canaux lacrymaux", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Eye Care Centre
Pamphlet Number
0176
Less detail

Retinal treatments

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36698
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
0461
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Light is reflected from objects and enters the pupil. It passes through the lens and vitreous (clear jelly-like fluid) onto your retina. Your retina changes light into a message. The optic nerve carries the message to your brain. When the brain receives the message, you have vision. Your retina is as thin as tissue paper. Change or damage to the retina can cause vision loss. This pamphlet explains how you can tell if your retina is damaged, what kinds of damage can happen to the retina, and typ…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (9 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Retina
Retinal diseases - therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Retina
Retina--Diseases
Specialty
Ophthalmology
Abstract
Light is reflected from objects and enters the pupil. It passes through the lens and vitreous (clear jelly-like fluid) onto your retina. Your retina changes light into a message. The optic nerve carries the message to your brain. When the brain receives the message, you have vision. Your retina is as thin as tissue paper. Change or damage to the retina can cause vision loss. This pamphlet explains how you can tell if your retina is damaged, what kinds of damage can happen to the retina, and types of treatments and surgery. The French version of this pamphlet 1718, "Greffe de cornée (kératoplastie)", is also available.
Notes
previous title: Retina Information and Treatments
Responsibility
Prepared by: Eye Care Centre
Pamphlet Number
0461
Less detail

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