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Implanted vascular access device (IVAD or "port")

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36613
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Minor Procedures, Nova Scotia Health Authority. Hants Community Hospital. Same Day Surgery Unit, Nova Scotia Health Authority. Yarmouth Regional Hospital. Oncology Unit. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2019.
Pamphlet Number
0421
Available Online
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An implanted vascular access device (IVAD) is a small device that goes into a large vein just above your heart. This makes it easier to give you intravenous (IV) medications and to take blood samples. It is also called a “port” or “port-a-cath.” A port is placed under your skin below your collarbone. Topics include: benefits, how it works, how to get ready for surgery, what to expect during and after surgery, care at home, and taking care of your port. A space to write your doctor's name and ph…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Minor Procedures
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Hants Community Hospital. Same Day Surgery Unit
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Yarmouth Regional Hospital. Oncology Unit
Alternate Title
Port
Port-a-cath
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2019
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Vascular Access Device
Neoplasms - therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Drug infusion pumps
Cancer--Treatment
Abstract
An implanted vascular access device (IVAD) is a small device that goes into a large vein just above your heart. This makes it easier to give you intravenous (IV) medications and to take blood samples. It is also called a “port” or “port-a-cath.” A port is placed under your skin below your collarbone. Topics include: benefits, how it works, how to get ready for surgery, what to expect during and after surgery, care at home, and taking care of your port. A space to write your doctor's name and phone number is given in case you have any problems.
Notes
Previous title: Implanted infusion port
Responsibility
Prepared by: Minor Procedures, QEII; SDSU, Hants Community Hospital; Oncology Unit, Yarmouth Regional Hospital
Pamphlet Number
0421
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Intervention pour débloquer les canaux lacrymaux

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36720
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2019.
Pamphlet Number
2097
Available Online
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L'opération ouvre une nouvelle voie pour que les larmes puissent s'écouler directement dans votre nez. Un tube en plastique peut être mis en place pendant l'opération et retiré six semaines à 12 mois plus tard, selon votre chirurgien ophtalmologiste. La brochure fournit une brève description de la préparation pour l’opération, du déroulement de l’intervention et des soins qui suivent. On y traite aussi des symptômes qui exigent des soins médicaux. ; This pamphlet is a French translation of "Rep…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre
Alternate Title
Repair of blocked tear duct
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2019
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures
Subjects (LCSH)
Eye--Surgery
Specialty
Ophthalmology
Abstract
L'opération ouvre une nouvelle voie pour que les larmes puissent s'écouler directement dans votre nez. Un tube en plastique peut être mis en place pendant l'opération et retiré six semaines à 12 mois plus tard, selon votre chirurgien ophtalmologiste. La brochure fournit une brève description de la préparation pour l’opération, du déroulement de l’intervention et des soins qui suivent. On y traite aussi des symptômes qui exigent des soins médicaux.
This pamphlet is a French translation of "Repair of Blocked Tear Duct" pamphlet 0176. This surgery makes a new path so tears can drain directly into your nose. A plastic tube may be put in during surgery and taken out 6 weeks to 12 months later, depending on your eye surgeon. A brief description of getting ready for surgery, during surgery, and care after is listed. Symptoms that need medical attention are noted.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Eye Care Centre
Pamphlet Number
2097
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42 records – page 3 of 3.