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Preparing for home : from admission to discharge

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37304
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Quality Improvement and Safety. Patient Experience. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
2173
Available Online
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When you are admitted to the hospital, you will be given an Estimated Date of Discharge (EDD). This date is when you can expect to go home, depending on how your health improves during your stay. It is important to start planning early for your discharge home. This pamphlet gives information about admission to a hospital inpatient unit, your health care team, what to expect each day, getting ready for discharge, and a list of important information. Information about patient/family feedback and …
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Quality Improvement and Safety. Patient Experience
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Hospital admission
Patient Discharge
Subjects (LCSH)
Hospitals--Admission and discharge
Specialty
Hospitals
Abstract
When you are admitted to the hospital, you will be given an Estimated Date of Discharge (EDD). This date is when you can expect to go home, depending on how your health improves during your stay. It is important to start planning early for your discharge home. This pamphlet gives information about admission to a hospital inpatient unit, your health care team, what to expect each day, getting ready for discharge, and a list of important information. Information about patient/family feedback and space to keep a journal of your hospital stay/illness are included.
The French version of this pamphlet 2290, "Se préparer au retour à la maison : de l’admission à la sortie," is also available.
Notes
Previous title: Preparing for home: from admission to discharge - Northern zone
Responsibility
Prepared by: Patient Experience - Quality Improvement and Safety
Pamphlet Number
2173
Less detail

Preventing the spread of germs and infections : routine practices and additional precautions

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35864
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Central Zone. Infection Prevention and Control. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
1822
Available Online
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Health care providers work hard to prevent the spread of germs from one person to another. This is important because some germs can cause infections. Routine practices are the minimum (least) steps taken to prevent and control infections while caring for all patients at all times. Additional precautions (such as contact, droplet or airborne precautions) are sometimes needed to keep germs from spreading from one patient to another. This pamphlet explains the infection prevention and control (IPA…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Central Zone. Infection Prevention and Control
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Infection Control
Subjects (LCSH)
Infection--Prevention
Specialty
Infectious Diseases
Hospitals
Abstract
Health care providers work hard to prevent the spread of germs from one person to another. This is important because some germs can cause infections. Routine practices are the minimum (least) steps taken to prevent and control infections while caring for all patients at all times. Additional precautions (such as contact, droplet or airborne precautions) are sometimes needed to keep germs from spreading from one patient to another. This pamphlet explains the infection prevention and control (IPAC) guidelines included in routine practices and additional precautions. The French version of this pamphlet 1860, "Prévenir la propagation des microbes et infections : Pratiques de base et précautions supplémentaires", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Infection Prevention and Control
Pamphlet Number
1822
Less detail

Prévenir la propagation des microbes et infections : pratiques de base et précautions supplémentaires

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35927
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Infection Prevention and Control. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
1860
Available Online
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Les fournisseurs de soins de santé travaillent fort pour prévenir la propagation des microbes d’une personne à l’autre. Cela est important parce que certains microbes peuvent causer des infections. Les « pratiques de base » sont les mesures minimales prises en tout temps pour prévenir et contrôler les infections dans la prestation des soins aux patients. Des « précautions supplémentaires » (comme les précautions contre la transmission par contact, par gouttelettes ou par voie aérienne) sont par…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Infection Prevention and Control
Alternate Title
Preventing the spread of germs and infections : routine practices and additional precautions
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Infection Control
Subjects (LCSH)
Infection--Prevention
Specialty
Infectious Diseases
Hospitals
Abstract
Les fournisseurs de soins de santé travaillent fort pour prévenir la propagation des microbes d’une personne à l’autre. Cela est important parce que certains microbes peuvent causer des infections. Les « pratiques de base » sont les mesures minimales prises en tout temps pour prévenir et contrôler les infections dans la prestation des soins aux patients. Des « précautions supplémentaires » (comme les précautions contre la transmission par contact, par gouttelettes ou par voie aérienne) sont parfois requises pour empêcher les microbes de se propager d’un patient à un autre. La présente brochure explique en quoi consistent les pratiques de base et les précautions supplémentaires.
This pamphlet is a French translation of "Preventing the Spread of Germs and Infections: Routine Practices and Additional Precautions" pamphlet 1822. Health care providers work hard to prevent the spread of germs from one person to another. This is important because some germs can cause infections. “Routine practices” are the minimum steps taken to prevent and control infection in the care of all patients at all times. Additional precautions (such as contact, droplet or airborne precautions) are sometimes needed to keep germs from spreading from one patient to another. This pamphlet explains the infection prevention and control (IPAC) guidelines included in routine practices and additional precautions.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Infection Prevention and Control
Pamphlet Number
1860
Less detail

Restraint considerations for patients and families

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37624
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Interprofessional Practice and Learning. Least Restraint Working Group. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
0599
Available Online
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A restraint is anything that limits a person’s movement. Restraints can help to keep you from getting hurt or hurting others, including your caregivers. Nova Scotia Health’s goal is to promote the health and well-being of all of our patients. We try to help you keep as much comfort, independence, and quality of life as possible. Nova Scotia Health policy states restraints are to be used only as a last resort. This pamphlet explains why and when restraints are used, ways you and your support per…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Interprofessional Practice and Learning. Least Restraint Working Group
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Geriatrics
Immobilization
Subjects (LCSH)
Geriatrics
Restraint of patients
Specialty
Geriatrics
Abstract
A restraint is anything that limits a person’s movement. Restraints can help to keep you from getting hurt or hurting others, including your caregivers. Nova Scotia Health’s goal is to promote the health and well-being of all of our patients. We try to help you keep as much comfort, independence, and quality of life as possible. Nova Scotia Health policy states restraints are to be used only as a last resort. This pamphlet explains why and when restraints are used, ways you and your support person(s) can help without using a restraint, and what to do If you are not happy with how you or your loved one is being restrained.
Responsibility
Prepared by: IPPL Least Restraint Working Group
Pamphlet Number
0599
Less detail

Self-administration of select subcutaneous chemotherapy drugs

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37603
Nova Scotia Health. Cancer Care Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
4034
Available Online
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You have been prescribed a drug for your cancer that can be given at home using a needle. Your cancer care team will give you the supplies needed to do this safely. This pamphlet explains how to give yourself the drug, including what to do before you start, how to get ready for the injection, choosing and preparing the injection site, and injecting the dose. You should keep a record of your injections and bring it with you to your next appointment. If you have any reactions to your injection or…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health. Cancer Care Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (4 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Neoplasms
Chemotherapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Cancer
Chemotherapy
Specialty
Cancer Care
Abstract
You have been prescribed a drug for your cancer that can be given at home using a needle. Your cancer care team will give you the supplies needed to do this safely. This pamphlet explains how to give yourself the drug, including what to do before you start, how to get ready for the injection, choosing and preparing the injection site, and injecting the dose. You should keep a record of your injections and bring it with you to your next appointment. If you have any reactions to your injection or if you notice any new or concerning symptoms, contact your cancer care team during daytime hours or go to the nearest Emergency Room.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program
Pamphlet Number
4034
Less detail

Se préparer au retour à la maison : de l’admission à la sortie

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37595
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Quality Improvement and Safety. Patient Experience. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
2290
Available Online
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Lorsque vous êtes admis à l’hôpital, on vous donne votre date de sortie prévue (DSP), c’est-à-dire la date à laquelle vous pouvez vous attendre à rentrer à la maison, en fonction de l’amélioration de votre santé pendant votre hospitalisation. Il est important que vous commenciez à préparer tôt votre retour à la maison. Ce dépliant donne des informations sur l’admission à l’hôpital, votre équipe soignante, ce à quoi vous pouvez vous attendre chaque jour et la préparation au retour à la maison; i…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Quality Improvement and Safety. Patient Experience
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Hospital admission
Patient Discharge
Subjects (LCSH)
Hospitals--Admission and discharge
Specialty
Hospitals
Abstract
Lorsque vous êtes admis à l’hôpital, on vous donne votre date de sortie prévue (DSP), c’est-à-dire la date à laquelle vous pouvez vous attendre à rentrer à la maison, en fonction de l’amélioration de votre santé pendant votre hospitalisation. Il est important que vous commenciez à préparer tôt votre retour à la maison. Ce dépliant donne des informations sur l’admission à l’hôpital, votre équipe soignante, ce à quoi vous pouvez vous attendre chaque jour et la préparation au retour à la maison; il contient de plus une liste d’autres informations importantes ainsi que des informations sur les commentaires des patients et des familles de même qu’un espace pour tenir un journal sur votre séjour à l’hôpital ou votre maladie.
This is a French translation of the English pamphlet 2173, "Preparing for Home: From Admission to Discharge". When you are admitted to the hospital, you will be given an Estimated Date of Discharge (EDD). This date is when you can expect to go home, depending on how your health improves during your stay. It is important to start planning early for your discharge home. This pamphlet gives information about admission to a hospital inpatient unit, your health care team, what to expect each day, getting ready for discharge, and a list of important information. Information about patient/family feedback and space to keep a journal of your hospital stay/illness are included.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Patient Experience - Quality Improvement and Safety
Pamphlet Number
2290
Less detail

Soothers : Cape Breton Regional Hospital

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36752
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cape Breton Regional Hospital. Baby Friendly Initiative. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
2289
Available Online
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This pamphlet gives information about soother use. Topics include how soothers can interfere with breastfeeding, risks, tips before offering a soother, things to keep in mind if you decide to use one, and care instructions. Contact information for more support is also included.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cape Breton Regional Hospital. Baby Friendly Initiative
Alternate Title
Pacifiers : Cape Breton Regional Hospital
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([6] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Pacifiers
Subjects (LCSH)
Pacifiers (Infant care)
Specialty
Gynecology
Abstract
This pamphlet gives information about soother use. Topics include how soothers can interfere with breastfeeding, risks, tips before offering a soother, things to keep in mind if you decide to use one, and care instructions. Contact information for more support is also included.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Cape Breton Regional Hospital Baby Friendly Initiative
Pamphlet Number
2289
Less detail

Taking your medications when you are sick after a kidney transplant

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35858
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Kidney Transplant Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
1805
Available Online
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This pamphlet lists medications you should not take if you get very sick with diarrhea (loose, watery poop), or you are vomiting (throwing up). These medications keep your blood pressure down, and protect your kidneys and heart. They can also harm you if you do not have enough fluids in your body. Diarrhea and vomiting can make you dehydrated (not have enough fluids in your body). Information about what to do if you have not taken your medication(s) for more than 1 day (24 hours) and/or cannot …
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Kidney Transplant Clinic
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Kidney transplantation
Medications
Subjects (LCSH)
Kidneys--Transplantation
Drugs
Specialty
Nephrology
Medications
Abstract
This pamphlet lists medications you should not take if you get very sick with diarrhea (loose, watery poop), or you are vomiting (throwing up). These medications keep your blood pressure down, and protect your kidneys and heart. They can also harm you if you do not have enough fluids in your body. Diarrhea and vomiting can make you dehydrated (not have enough fluids in your body). Information about what to do if you have not taken your medication(s) for more than 1 day (24 hours) and/or cannot keep fluids down without vomiting is included.
Notes
Previous title: Taking your medications when you are ill after a kidney transplant : a guide for patients with a kidney transplant
Responsibility
Prepared by: Kidney Transplant Clinic, QEII
Pamphlet Number
1805
Less detail

Talking about patient safety incidents

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35354
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Quality Improvement and Safety. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
1448
Available Online
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People expect safe health care. Health care providers work hard every day to give safe, excellent care. Despite our best efforts to keep you safe, there are risks to being in the hospital. For example, a patient may fall, or get an infection or a pressure injury (bedsore), or be given the wrong dose of medication. These events are called patient safety incidents. This pamphlet explains what patient safety incidents are, what to do if you notice a patient safety incident, how patient safety inci…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Quality Improvement and Safety
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Truth Disclosure
Risk Management
Patient Safety
Subjects (LCSH)
Disclosure of information
Risk management
Patient safety
Specialty
Hospitals
Abstract
People expect safe health care. Health care providers work hard every day to give safe, excellent care. Despite our best efforts to keep you safe, there are risks to being in the hospital. For example, a patient may fall, or get an infection or a pressure injury (bedsore), or be given the wrong dose of medication. These events are called patient safety incidents. This pamphlet explains what patient safety incidents are, what to do if you notice a patient safety incident, how patient safety incidents are reported, what disclosure is and how it will help you, and how disclosure takes place. A list of resources for further information is included. The French version of this pamphlet 1712, "Incidents liés à la sécurité des patients", is also available.
Notes
Previous title: Patients first disclosure: when something goes wrong during your health care
Previous title: Patients first: disclosure of patient safety incidents
Responsibility
Prepared by: Quality Improvement and Safety
Pamphlet Number
1448
Less detail

What to eat after whipple surgery

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37492
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1366
Available Online
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During Whipple surgery, parts of the stomach, small bowel, gallbladder, and pancreas are removed. These organs are important for digesting food. After surgery you may need to make some changes to your eating habits. Following the tips in this guide can help you get the nutrition you need to heal, feel comfortable during the first 4 weeks (1 month) after surgery, and keep or gain weight after surgery. Foods that are best tolerated and foods to avoid are listed. Other topics include whether you w…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (10 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diet therapy
Postoperative Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Postoperative care
Gastrointestinal system
Specialty
Food and Nutrition
Abstract
During Whipple surgery, parts of the stomach, small bowel, gallbladder, and pancreas are removed. These organs are important for digesting food. After surgery you may need to make some changes to your eating habits. Following the tips in this guide can help you get the nutrition you need to heal, feel comfortable during the first 4 weeks (1 month) after surgery, and keep or gain weight after surgery. Foods that are best tolerated and foods to avoid are listed. Other topics include whether you will need to take pancreatic enzymes, what to do if your stomach is slow to empty, what to do if you get dumping syndrome, whether you will need to take vitamins after surgery, and what to do if you are losing weight. Recipes are included.
Responsibility
Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
1366
Less detail

What you need to know about taking antioxidants during your radiation therapy

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37528
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program, Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program Education Team. [Halifax, NS]: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
4015
Available Online
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Antioxidants are nutrients found in some foods and also in supplements such as pills. Antioxidants help your body protect and repair your cells from damage to keep them working normally. The goal of radiation therapy is to damage your cancer cells. Taking antioxidants may prevent your radiation treatment from working as well as it should because it may prevent some of the damage we are trying to cause to your cancer cells. This pamphlet explains whether you should take antioxidants during radia…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program Education Team
Place of Publication
[Halifax, NS]
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([2] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Neoplasms
Radiation
Subjects (LCSH)
Cancer
Radiation
Specialty
Cancer Care
Abstract
Antioxidants are nutrients found in some foods and also in supplements such as pills. Antioxidants help your body protect and repair your cells from damage to keep them working normally. The goal of radiation therapy is to damage your cancer cells. Taking antioxidants may prevent your radiation treatment from working as well as it should because it may prevent some of the damage we are trying to cause to your cancer cells. This pamphlet explains whether you should take antioxidants during radiation therapy, what vitamins and supplements you can take, and whether you can eat foods with antioxidants in them. Where to get more information is also included.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program; Approved by: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program Education Team
Pamphlet Number
4015
Less detail

51 records – page 3 of 3.