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Low fibre, low lactose nutrition guidelines

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams38155
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
0561
Available Online
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Eating less fibre and lactose may help with gas, cramping, and diarrhea (loose, watery poop). This pamphlet explains what fibre and lactose are, and provides lists of best choices and foods to avoid.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (8 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Dietary Fiber
Lactose
Nutrition Therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Fiber in human nutrition
Lactose intolerance
Diet therapy
Abstract
Eating less fibre and lactose may help with gas, cramping, and diarrhea (loose, watery poop). This pamphlet explains what fibre and lactose are, and provides lists of best choices and foods to avoid.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
0561
Less detail
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Halifax Infirmary. Neurosciences. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0614
Available Online
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This pamphlet will help you learn about your halo brace. A halo brace is worn so that your neck fracture heals properly. This is similar to how a plaster cast protects a broken arm or leg while it is healing. This pamphlet gives information about balance and movement, hygiene, best options for clothing and shoes, and pin sites care. Information about halo vests, loose nuts and bolts, common concerns, activity while wearing a halo brace, and how long you will need to wear the halo brace is inclu…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Halifax Infirmary. Neurosciences
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (12 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Braces
Neck Injuries
Subjects (LCSH)
Orthopedic braces
Neck--Wounds and injuries
Specialty
Nervous System
Abstract
This pamphlet will help you learn about your halo brace. A halo brace is worn so that your neck fracture heals properly. This is similar to how a plaster cast protects a broken arm or leg while it is healing. This pamphlet gives information about balance and movement, hygiene, best options for clothing and shoes, and pin sites care. Information about halo vests, loose nuts and bolts, common concerns, activity while wearing a halo brace, and how long you will need to wear the halo brace is included.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Neurosciences, Halifax Infirmary
Pamphlet Number
0614
Less detail

Over-the-counter medications and chronic kidney disease (CKD)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35643
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
1636
Available Online
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If you have chronic kidney disease (CKD), you need to know which over-the-counter medications are your best choices and which you should not take. This pamphlet lists over-the-counter medications you may need for a cough or cold, fever or pain, allergies, an upset stomach (indigestion, burning pain) or heartburn, nausea (feeling sick to your stomach) or vomiting (throwing up), diarrhea (loose, watery poop), and constipation, as well as multivitamins, and creams and ointments. Information on why…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (9 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Nonprescription Drugs
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - drug therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Drugs, Nonprescription
Chronic renal failure
Abstract
If you have chronic kidney disease (CKD), you need to know which over-the-counter medications are your best choices and which you should not take. This pamphlet lists over-the-counter medications you may need for a cough or cold, fever or pain, allergies, an upset stomach (indigestion, burning pain) or heartburn, nausea (feeling sick to your stomach) or vomiting (throwing up), diarrhea (loose, watery poop), and constipation, as well as multivitamins, and creams and ointments. Information on why you should not take any herbal or natural health products is included.
Notes
Previous title: Over-the-counter medications & chronic kidney disease
Responsibility
Prepared by: Renal Program
Pamphlet Number
1636
Less detail

Nutrition guidelines after stomach surgery

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35052
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0531
Available Online
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After having surgery, you will need to change the way you eat. You may find that you feel full quickly and are only able to eat small amounts at a time. Some people experience dumping syndrome. This happens when food enters the intestine too quickly. This can cause cramping, diarrhea (loose, watery poop), and other symptoms. This pamphlet offers guidelines to help prevent or lessen dumping syndrome and stay healthy after surgery. Topics include what you should do if you are losing weight and wh…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Stomach - surgery
Dumping Syndrome - diet therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Stomach--Surgery--Complications
Dumping syndrome
Nutrition
Specialty
Food and Nutrition
Abstract
After having surgery, you will need to change the way you eat. You may find that you feel full quickly and are only able to eat small amounts at a time. Some people experience dumping syndrome. This happens when food enters the intestine too quickly. This can cause cramping, diarrhea (loose, watery poop), and other symptoms. This pamphlet offers guidelines to help prevent or lessen dumping syndrome and stay healthy after surgery. Topics include what you should do if you are losing weight and whether you need to take a vitamin and mineral supplement. A sample meal plan is included.
Notes
Previous title: Eating after stomach surgery
Previous title: What to eat after stomach surgery
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
0531
Less detail

Taking your medications when you are sick after a kidney transplant

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35858
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Kidney Transplant Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
1805
Available Online
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This pamphlet lists medications you should not take if you get very sick with diarrhea (loose, watery poop), or you are vomiting (throwing up). These medications keep your blood pressure down, and protect your kidneys and heart. They can also harm you if you do not have enough fluids in your body. Diarrhea and vomiting can make you dehydrated (not have enough fluids in your body). Information about what to do if you have not taken your medication(s) for more than 1 day (24 hours) and/or cannot …
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Kidney Transplant Clinic
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Kidney transplantation
Medications
Subjects (LCSH)
Kidneys--Transplantation
Drugs
Specialty
Nephrology
Medications
Abstract
This pamphlet lists medications you should not take if you get very sick with diarrhea (loose, watery poop), or you are vomiting (throwing up). These medications keep your blood pressure down, and protect your kidneys and heart. They can also harm you if you do not have enough fluids in your body. Diarrhea and vomiting can make you dehydrated (not have enough fluids in your body). Information about what to do if you have not taken your medication(s) for more than 1 day (24 hours) and/or cannot keep fluids down without vomiting is included.
Notes
Previous title: Taking your medications when you are ill after a kidney transplant : a guide for patients with a kidney transplant
Responsibility
Prepared by: Kidney Transplant Clinic, QEII
Pamphlet Number
1805
Less detail