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Dalteparin (Fragmin) to prevent clotting during hemodialysis

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35807
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
1760
Available Online
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Dalteparin is a medication that is part of a group of drugs called blood thinners. Fragmin® is the brand name of dalteparin. During hemodialysis your blood passes through the dialysis blood lines and a dialyzer (artificial kidney), which can cause clots to form. Dalteparin stops clots from forming. This pamphlet explains how to take dalteparin, possible side effects, and symptoms that you should mention to your nurse.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Dalteparin
Renal Dialysis
Subjects (LCSH)
Hemodialysis
Blood--coagulation
Specialty
Nephrology
Abstract
Dalteparin is a medication that is part of a group of drugs called blood thinners. Fragmin® is the brand name of dalteparin. During hemodialysis your blood passes through the dialysis blood lines and a dialyzer (artificial kidney), which can cause clots to form. Dalteparin stops clots from forming. This pamphlet explains how to take dalteparin, possible side effects, and symptoms that you should mention to your nurse.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Renal Program
Pamphlet Number
1760
Less detail

Erythropoieis-stimulating agents (ESAs) for chronic kidney disease (CKD) : with active cancer or a history of cancer or stroke

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37446
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
2217
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are a group of medicines that help take the place of a hormone called erythropoietin (EPO). People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may not have enough EPO coming from their kidneys to tell their body to make more red blood cells. This can cause their red blood cell count to drop and anemia (not enough red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood) to develop. If you have CKD and active cancer or a history of cancer of stroke, it is important to carefully …
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([2] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Renal insufficiency, chronic - complications
Anemia - drug therapy
Hematinics - therapeutic use
Neoplasms
Stroke
Subjects (LCSH)
Chronic renal failure--Complications
Hematopoietic growth factors
Renal anemia--Chemotherapy
Cancer
Cerebrovascular disease
Abstract
Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are a group of medicines that help take the place of a hormone called erythropoietin (EPO). People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may not have enough EPO coming from their kidneys to tell their body to make more red blood cells. This can cause their red blood cell count to drop and anemia (not enough red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood) to develop. If you have CKD and active cancer or a history of cancer of stroke, it is important to carefully consider the risks and benefits of ESAs. The risks and benefits of ESAs are listed. Your health care team will talk with you about the risks and benefits of ESAs and other factors to consider when making the decision to take ESAs.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Renal Program
Pamphlet Number
2217
Less detail

Erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy and chronic kidney disease (CKD)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35406
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
1493
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are a group of medicines that help take the place of a hormone called erythropoietin (EPO). People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may not have enough EPO coming from their kidneys to tell their body to make more red blood cells. This can cause their red blood cell count to drop and anemia (not enough red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood) to develop. How to take and store this medicine and possible side effects to watch for are reviewed.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Renal insufficiency, chronic - complications
Anemia - drug therapy
Hematinics - therapeutic use
Subjects (LCSH)
Chronic renal failure--Complications
Hematopoietic growth factors
Renal anemia--Chemotherapy
Abstract
Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are a group of medicines that help take the place of a hormone called erythropoietin (EPO). People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may not have enough EPO coming from their kidneys to tell their body to make more red blood cells. This can cause their red blood cell count to drop and anemia (not enough red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood) to develop. How to take and store this medicine and possible side effects to watch for are reviewed.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Renal Program
Pamphlet Number
1493
Less detail

Fer injectable et insuffisance rénale chronique (IRC)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37473
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
2161
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Si votre corps manque d’oxygène en raison d’une carence en fer, il se peut que vous soyez fatigué ou essoufflé. On appelle cela l’anémie ferriprive. Beaucoup de patients atteints d’insuffisance rénale chronique (IRC) ou dialysés souffrent d’anémie, car ils n’ont pas assez de globules rouges, et le corps a besoin de fer pour les fabriquer. Prendre du fer par injection permet donc au corps d’avoir suffisamment de fer pour fabriquer de l’hémoglobine, c’est-à-dire la protéine qui transporte l’oxygè…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program
Alternate Title
Injectable iron and chronic kidney disease (CKD)
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Renal Dialysis
Iron - therapeutic use
Kidney Diseases
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency
Subjects (LCSH)
Hemodialysis
Chronic renal failure--Complications
Iron deficiency anemia
Abstract
Si votre corps manque d’oxygène en raison d’une carence en fer, il se peut que vous soyez fatigué ou essoufflé. On appelle cela l’anémie ferriprive. Beaucoup de patients atteints d’insuffisance rénale chronique (IRC) ou dialysés souffrent d’anémie, car ils n’ont pas assez de globules rouges, et le corps a besoin de fer pour les fabriquer. Prendre du fer par injection permet donc au corps d’avoir suffisamment de fer pour fabriquer de l’hémoglobine, c’est-à-dire la protéine qui transporte l’oxygène. Ce dépliant explique comment prendre du fer injectable, ses effets possibles et comment le conserver.
This pamphlet is a French translation of the English pamphlet 1495, "Injectable Iron and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)". If your body is not getting enough oxygen due to lack of iron, you may feel tired or short of breath. This is called iron deficiency anemia. Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), or who are on dialysis, have anemia because their red blood cells are low. The body needs iron to help make new red blood cells. Getting iron injections can help make sure that you have enough iron in your body to make the oxygen-carrying part (hemoglobin) of your red blood cells. This pamphlet explains how to take injectable iron, side effects to watch for, and instructions on how to store the medication.
Notes
Previous title: Injectable iron sucrose and chronic kidney disease
Responsibility
Prepared by: NSHA Renal Program
Pamphlet Number
2161
Less detail

Injectable iron and chronic kidney disease (CKD)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35408
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
1495
Available Online
View Pamphlet
If your body is not getting enough oxygen due to lack of iron, you may feel tired or short of breath. This is called iron deficiency anemia. Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), or who are on dialysis, have anemia because their red blood cells are low. The body needs iron to help make new red blood cells. Getting iron injections can help make sure that you have enough iron in your body to make the oxygen-carrying part (hemoglobin) of your red blood cells. This pamphlet explains how …
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Renal Dialysis
Iron - therapeutic use
Kidney Diseases
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency
Subjects (LCSH)
Hemodialysis
Chronic renal failure--Complications
Iron deficiency anemia
Abstract
If your body is not getting enough oxygen due to lack of iron, you may feel tired or short of breath. This is called iron deficiency anemia. Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), or who are on dialysis, have anemia because their red blood cells are low. The body needs iron to help make new red blood cells. Getting iron injections can help make sure that you have enough iron in your body to make the oxygen-carrying part (hemoglobin) of your red blood cells. This pamphlet explains how to take injectable iron, side effects to watch for, and instructions on how to store the medication. The French version of this pamphlet 2161, "Fer injectable et insuffisance rénale chronique (IRC)," is also available.
Notes
Previous title: Injectable iron sucrose and chronic kidney disease
Responsibility
Prepared by: NSHA Renal Program
Pamphlet Number
1495
Less detail

Oral irons and chronic kidney disease (CKD)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35375
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
1469
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Your red blood cells need iron to help carry oxygen through your body. Many people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have anemia (not enough red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood). Oral irons, such as ferrous sulfate, ferrous gluconate, ferrous fumarate, and FeraMAX® 150, will give you enough iron to make make hemoglobin. This will make sure your body gets enough oxygen. How to take and store these medicines, and what side effects to watch for are reviewed.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Renal Program
Alternate Title
Oral irons and CKD
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Renal insufficiency, chronic - complications
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - drug therapy
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - drug therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Chronic renal failure--Complications
Iron deficiency anemia
Renal pharmacology
Abstract
Your red blood cells need iron to help carry oxygen through your body. Many people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have anemia (not enough red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood). Oral irons, such as ferrous sulfate, ferrous gluconate, ferrous fumarate, and FeraMAX® 150, will give you enough iron to make make hemoglobin. This will make sure your body gets enough oxygen. How to take and store these medicines, and what side effects to watch for are reviewed.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Renal Program
Pamphlet Number
1469
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.