Skip header and navigation

Narrow By

16 records – page 1 of 1.

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Day Treatment Program

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36590
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Acquired Brain Injury Ambulatory Care Teams. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
2012
Available Online
View Pamphlet
The Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Day Treatment Program is a supportive group where you can: learn about ABI, learn ways to manage ongoing challenges related to your ABI, meet people with similar experiences, and explore your strengths. This pamphlet explains who the program is for, who is eligible, and the two parts of the program. Contact information is provided.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Acquired Brain Injury Ambulatory Care Teams
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Brain Injuries - rehabilitation
Brain Injuries - psychology
Subjects (LCSH)
Brain--Wounds and injuries--Complications
Brain--Wounds and injuries--Patients--Rehabilitation
Abstract
The Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Day Treatment Program is a supportive group where you can: learn about ABI, learn ways to manage ongoing challenges related to your ABI, meet people with similar experiences, and explore your strengths. This pamphlet explains who the program is for, who is eligible, and the two parts of the program. Contact information is provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Ambulatory Care Teams
Pamphlet Number
2012
Less detail
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Angiography Unit, Nova Scotia Health Authority. Diagnostic Imaging. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
0001
Available Online
View Pamphlet
During this special X-ray test, a colourless dye is injected into your blood vessels so that they can be seen on X-ray. An angiogram can be used to X-ray blood vessels in various parts of the body. This pamphlet describes getting ready for the test, how the test is done, and care after the test.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Angiography Unit
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Diagnostic Imaging
Alternate Title
Arteriogram
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Angiography
Blood Vessels
Subjects (LCSH)
Angiography
Blood-vessels
Specialty
Diagnostic Imaging
Abstract
During this special X-ray test, a colourless dye is injected into your blood vessels so that they can be seen on X-ray. An angiogram can be used to X-ray blood vessels in various parts of the body. This pamphlet describes getting ready for the test, how the test is done, and care after the test.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Angiography Unit, Diagnostic Imaging
Pamphlet Number
0001
Less detail

Blood components, products, and alternatives

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35223
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Perioperative Blood Management Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1202
Available Online
View Pamphlet
A blood transfusion is when you receive donated blood. If you have had blood loss from trauma or surgery, or because of certain medical problems, you may need a blood transfusion. This pamphlet explains the blood components (parts), products, and alternatives that you may receive as part of a blood transfusion. A description, how it is given, benefits, and possible side effects of each product are given.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Perioperative Blood Management Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (18 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Blood Transfusion
Blood
Plasma
Subjects (LCSH)
Blood--Transfusion
Blood products
Specialty
Hematology
Abstract
A blood transfusion is when you receive donated blood. If you have had blood loss from trauma or surgery, or because of certain medical problems, you may need a blood transfusion. This pamphlet explains the blood components (parts), products, and alternatives that you may receive as part of a blood transfusion. A description, how it is given, benefits, and possible side effects of each product are given.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Perioperative Blood Management Program
Pamphlet Number
1202
Less detail

Cancer and distress

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37343
Nova Scotia Health. Cancer Care Provincial Supportive Care Site Team, Nova Scotia Health. Cancer Care Program Education Team. [Halifax, NS]: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
4012
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Cancer can be a difficult and stressful illness. Many people experience distress during their cancer experience. This is because cancer affects more than just your body – it can affect many parts of your life such as your emotions and feelings, your work, your finances, and your relationships with family and friends. This pamphlet explains what the "Patients Come First: Your Symptoms and Concerns Matter" questionnaire is, what to expect when you complete the questionnaire, and the benefits of c…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health. Cancer Care Provincial Supportive Care Site Team
Nova Scotia Health. Cancer Care Program Education Team
Place of Publication
[Halifax, NS]
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([2] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Anxiety - prevention & control
Neoplasms - psychology
Patients - psychology
Psychological Distress
Subjects (LCSH)
Anxiety--Prevention
Cancer--Patients--Psychology
Cancer--Psychological aspects
Distress (Psychology)
Specialty
Cancer Care
Abstract
Cancer can be a difficult and stressful illness. Many people experience distress during their cancer experience. This is because cancer affects more than just your body – it can affect many parts of your life such as your emotions and feelings, your work, your finances, and your relationships with family and friends. This pamphlet explains what the "Patients Come First: Your Symptoms and Concerns Matter" questionnaire is, what to expect when you complete the questionnaire, and the benefits of completing the questionnaire.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Provincial Supportive Care Site Team; Approved by: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program Education Team
Pamphlet Number
4012
Less detail

ERV (Entérocoques résistants à la vancomycine)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35923
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Infection Prevention and Control. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1857
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Les entérocoques sont des bactéries souvent présentes dans notre intestin. Lorsque les entérocoques se déplacent vers d’autres parties du corps, ils peuvent provoquer une infection et rendre malade. Les antibiotiques, comme la vancomycine, sont des médicaments utilisés pour traiter certaines infections. Les entérocoques développent parfois une résistance à la vancomycine ou à d’autres antibiotiques. Quand cela se produit, on dit que les bactéries sont « résistantes » à la vancomycine et on parl…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Infection Prevention and Control
Alternate Title
VRE (Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus)
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci
Subjects (LCSH)
Enterococcus
Drug resistance in microorganisms
Specialty
Infectious Diseases
Abstract
Les entérocoques sont des bactéries souvent présentes dans notre intestin. Lorsque les entérocoques se déplacent vers d’autres parties du corps, ils peuvent provoquer une infection et rendre malade. Les antibiotiques, comme la vancomycine, sont des médicaments utilisés pour traiter certaines infections. Les entérocoques développent parfois une résistance à la vancomycine ou à d’autres antibiotiques. Quand cela se produit, on dit que les bactéries sont « résistantes » à la vancomycine et on parle des entérocoques résistants à la vancomycine, ou ERV. Ce dépliant explique comment une personne contracte des ERV, comment on les détecte, les soins dispensés à l’hôpital et à la maison et la façon de prévenir la transmission des ERV.
This pamphlet is a French translation of "VRE (Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus)" pamphlet 1752. Enterococci (plural of enterococcus) are bacteria that are commonly found in our bowel (gut). If enterococci travel to other parts of the body, they can cause an infection and make you sick. Antibiotics (such as vancomycin) are medications used to treat infections. Sometimes enterococci bacteria become unable to be destroyed by vancomycin or other antibiotics. When this happens, the bacteria are called resistant to vancomycin, and are known as vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE). This pamphlet identifies how VRE is spread, screening for VRE, care in hospital and at home, and infection prevention and control (IPAC) guidelines to prevent spreading VRE.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Infection Prevention and Control
Pamphlet Number
1857
Less detail

Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37500
Nova Scotia Health Authority. GU Cancer Site Team. [Halifax, NS]: Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
4010
Available Online
View Pamphlet
The prostate is a gland that makes seminal fluid. Prostate cancer is a disease where cancer cells start to grow in the prostate gland. These cancer cells grow into a tumor and can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and lymph nodes. This pamphlet explains what causes prostate cancer, what hormones are, what testosterone does, how hormone therapy works for prostate cancer, how long you will be on hormone therapy, and side effects. A list of resources for further information is pr…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. GU Cancer Site Team
Place of Publication
[Halifax, NS]
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Prostatic Neoplasms
Hormones
Subjects (LCSH)
Prostate--Cancer--Treatment
Specialty
Cancer Care
Urogenital System
Abstract
The prostate is a gland that makes seminal fluid. Prostate cancer is a disease where cancer cells start to grow in the prostate gland. These cancer cells grow into a tumor and can spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and lymph nodes. This pamphlet explains what causes prostate cancer, what hormones are, what testosterone does, how hormone therapy works for prostate cancer, how long you will be on hormone therapy, and side effects. A list of resources for further information is provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: GU Cancer Site Team; Approved by: Nova Scotia Cancer Patient Education Committee
Pamphlet Number
4010
Less detail
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Gynaecology. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2018.
Pamphlet Number
1907
Available Online
View Pamphlet
A hysterectomy is an operation to remove your uterus (womb) and cervix. Other tissue, such as the ovaries, fallopian tubes, lymph nodes and parts of the vagina, may also be removed at the same time. After surgery you will have an incision in your abdomen, an intravenous (IV), a catheter (tube) in your bladder to drain urine, if needed. You may also have packing (absorbent material) to absorb blood and fluid in your vagina. Topics in this pamphlet include breathing, managing pain, activity, food…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Gynaecology
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2018
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Hysterectomy
Postoperative Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Hysterectomy
Postoperative care
Abstract
A hysterectomy is an operation to remove your uterus (womb) and cervix. Other tissue, such as the ovaries, fallopian tubes, lymph nodes and parts of the vagina, may also be removed at the same time. After surgery you will have an incision in your abdomen, an intravenous (IV), a catheter (tube) in your bladder to drain urine, if needed. You may also have packing (absorbent material) to absorb blood and fluid in your vagina. Topics in this pamphlet include breathing, managing pain, activity, food, bowel activity, vaginal bleeding, incision care, blood clots, and leg swelling. Information on care at home and sex after surgery is provided. Symptoms that require medical attention are given and a resources section is provided. The French version of this pamphlet 1921, "Hystérectomie", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Angela Whynot, Nurse Educator
Pamphlet Number
1907
Less detail
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Gynaecology. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2018.
Pamphlet Number
1921
Available Online
View Pamphlet
L’hystérectomie est une opération qui permet d’enlever l’utérus et le col de l’utérus. D’autres tissus comme les ovaires, les trompes de Fallope, des ganglions lymphatiques et des parties du vagin peuvent aussi être enlevés en même temps. Après l’opération, vous aurez une ou quelques incisions sur l’abdomen, une intraveineuse (IV) et un cathéter (tube) dans la vessie pour drainer l’urine, au besoin. Vous pourriez aussi avoir un tamponnement (matière absorbante) pour absorber le sang et le liqui…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Gynaecology
Alternate Title
Hysterectomy
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2018
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Hysterectomy
Postoperative Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Hysterectomy
Postoperative care
Abstract
L’hystérectomie est une opération qui permet d’enlever l’utérus et le col de l’utérus. D’autres tissus comme les ovaires, les trompes de Fallope, des ganglions lymphatiques et des parties du vagin peuvent aussi être enlevés en même temps. Après l’opération, vous aurez une ou quelques incisions sur l’abdomen, une intraveineuse (IV) et un cathéter (tube) dans la vessie pour drainer l’urine, au besoin. Vous pourriez aussi avoir un tamponnement (matière absorbante) pour absorber le sang et le liquide s’écoulant de votre vagin. La présente brochure traite de la respiration, de la gestion de la douleur, de l’activité, de l’alimentation, des selles, des saignements vaginaux, des soins des incisions, des caillots de sang et de l’enflure des jambes. On fournit aussi de l’information sur les soins à la maison et les rapports sexuels après la chirurgie. On précise les symptômes qui exigent des soins médicaux et on propose des ressources.
This pamphlet is a French translation of "Hysterectomy" pamphlet 1907. A hysterectomy is an operation to remove your uterus (womb) and cervix. Other tissue, such as the ovaries, fallopian tubes, lymph nodes and parts of the vagina, may also be removed at the same time. After surgery you will have an incision in your abdomen, an intravenous (IV), a catheter (tube) in your bladder to drain urine, if needed. You may also have packing (absorbent material) to absorb blood and fluid in your vagina. Topics in this pamphlet include breathing, managing pain, activity, food, bowel activity, vaginal bleeding, incision care, blood clots, and leg swelling. Information on care at home and sex after surgery is provided. Symptoms that require medical attention are given and a resources section is provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Angela Whynot, Nurse Educator
Pamphlet Number
1921
Less detail

Memory after acquired brain injury (ABI)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36548
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Acquired Brain Injury Ambulatory Care Teams. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
1986
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Memory has many parts. It includes taking in, storing, and recalling information. After an acquired brain injury (ABI), you may have changes in your memory. This is common. This pamphlet explains how memory changes might affect you, and tips for managing your memory. A resources section is included.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Acquired Brain Injury Ambulatory Care Teams
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([2] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Memory
Brain Injuries - psychology
Subjects (LCSH)
Memory
Brain--Wounds and injuries--Complications
Abstract
Memory has many parts. It includes taking in, storing, and recalling information. After an acquired brain injury (ABI), you may have changes in your memory. This is common. This pamphlet explains how memory changes might affect you, and tips for managing your memory. A resources section is included.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Acquired Brain Injury Ambulatory Care Teams
Pamphlet Number
1986
Less detail

Nocturnal dialysis nutrition guidelines

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35668
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
1655
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Nocturnal Home Hemodialysis (NHHD) is a type of dialysis done at home overnight, usually for 8 to 9 hours, 5 to 6 nights a week. The main parts of the NHHD nutrition plan are protein, phosphorus, sodium (salt), fluids, and potassium. This pamphlet gives information about each of these items, as well as a sample meal plan.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (7 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Kidney Diseases - diet therapy
Hemodialysis, Home
Subjects (LCSH)
Kidneys--Diseases--Nutritional aspects
Home hemodialysis
Specialty
Food and Nutrition
Abstract
Nocturnal Home Hemodialysis (NHHD) is a type of dialysis done at home overnight, usually for 8 to 9 hours, 5 to 6 nights a week. The main parts of the NHHD nutrition plan are protein, phosphorus, sodium (salt), fluids, and potassium. This pamphlet gives information about each of these items, as well as a sample meal plan.
Notes
Previous title: Nocturnal dialysis diet
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
1655
Less detail

Nutrition information for patients having radiation treatment for head and neck cancer

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37436
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1701
Available Online
View Pamphlet
One of the most important parts of your care during radiation treatment for head and neck cancer is getting enough nutrition and hydration. This pamphlet explains how to increase your protein and calories, and manage your diet. It also explains how to deal with common eating problems that may arise, such as dry mouth, swallowing and chewing problems, sore mouth or throat, and taste changes.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (9 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Diet, Healthy
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diet therapy
Head and Neck Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Self Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Cancer--Diet therapy
Head--Cancer--Radiotherapy
Neck--Cancer--Radiotherapy
Self-care, Health
Abstract
One of the most important parts of your care during radiation treatment for head and neck cancer is getting enough nutrition and hydration. This pamphlet explains how to increase your protein and calories, and manage your diet. It also explains how to deal with common eating problems that may arise, such as dry mouth, swallowing and chewing problems, sore mouth or throat, and taste changes.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Horizon Health, Prince Edward Island Cancer Treatment Centre, Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program and Vitalite Health Network Cancer Care
Approved by: Nova Scotia Cancer Patient Education Committee
Pamphlet Number
1701
Less detail

Nutrition information for patients having radiation treatment for head and neck cancer (vegan options)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37437
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1702
Available Online
View Pamphlet
One of the most important parts of your care during radiation treatment for head and neck cancer is getting enough nutrition and hydration. This pamphlet explains how to increase your protein and calories, and manage your diet with vegan options. It also explains how to deal with common eating problems that may arise, such as dry mouth, swallowing and chewing problems, sore mouth or throat, and taste changes.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (9 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Diet, Vegan
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diet therapy
Head and Neck Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Self Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Cancer--Diet therapy
Head--Cancer--Radiotherapy
Neck--Cancer--Radiotherapy
Self-care, Health
Vegan cooking
Abstract
One of the most important parts of your care during radiation treatment for head and neck cancer is getting enough nutrition and hydration. This pamphlet explains how to increase your protein and calories, and manage your diet with vegan options. It also explains how to deal with common eating problems that may arise, such as dry mouth, swallowing and chewing problems, sore mouth or throat, and taste changes.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Horizon Health, Prince Edward Island Cancer Treatment Centre, Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program and Vitalite Health Network Cancer Care
Approved by: Nova Scotia Cancer Patient Education Committee
Pamphlet Number
1702
Less detail

Nutrition information for patients having radiation treatment for head and neck cancer (vegetarian options)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37438
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1703
Available Online
View Pamphlet
One of the most important parts of your care during radiation treatment for head and neck cancer is getting enough nutrition and hydration. This pamphlet explains how to increase your protein and calories, and manage your diet with vegetarian options. It also explains how to deal with common eating problems that may arise, such as dry mouth, swallowing and chewing problems, sore mouth or throat, and taste changes.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cancer Care Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (9 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Diet, Vegetarian
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diet therapy
Head and Neck Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Self Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Cancer--Diet therapy
Head--Cancer--Radiotherapy
Neck--Cancer--Radiotherapy
Self-care, Health
Vegetarian cooking
Abstract
One of the most important parts of your care during radiation treatment for head and neck cancer is getting enough nutrition and hydration. This pamphlet explains how to increase your protein and calories, and manage your diet with vegetarian options. It also explains how to deal with common eating problems that may arise, such as dry mouth, swallowing and chewing problems, sore mouth or throat, and taste changes.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Horizon Health, Prince Edward Island Cancer Treatment Centre, Nova Scotia Health Cancer Care Program and Vitalite Health Network Cancer Care
Approved by: Nova Scotia Cancer Patient Education Committee
Pamphlet Number
1703
Less detail

Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35808
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
1761
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common eye condition that can cause floaters (dots or spots) and flashes of light in your vision. PVD happens when your vitreous humor (a gel at the back of your eye) starts to shrink and becomes liquid. A healthy vitreous humour is attached to a part of your eye called the retina. When the vitreous humour shrinks, it can detach (come apart) from parts of the retina. This pamphlet explains what causes PVD, the symptoms of PVD, and how PVD is diagnosed an…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Eye Care Centre
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Vitreous Detachment
Subjects (LCSH)
Vitreous humor
Specialty
Ophthalmology
Abstract
Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common eye condition that can cause floaters (dots or spots) and flashes of light in your vision. PVD happens when your vitreous humor (a gel at the back of your eye) starts to shrink and becomes liquid. A healthy vitreous humour is attached to a part of your eye called the retina. When the vitreous humour shrinks, it can detach (come apart) from parts of the retina. This pamphlet explains what causes PVD, the symptoms of PVD, and how PVD is diagnosed and treated. Information about follow-up care is given. The French version of this pamphlet 2162, "Décollement postérieur du vitré (DPV)," is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Eye Care Centre; Illustration by: Dr. Darrell Lewis
Pamphlet Number
1761
Less detail

VRE (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35798
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Infection Prevention and Control. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1752
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Enterococci (plural of enterococcus) are bacteria that are commonly found in our bowel (gut). If enterococci travel to other parts of the body, they can cause an infection and make you sick. Antibiotics (such as vancomycin) are medications used to treat infections. Sometimes enterococci bacteria become unable to be destroyed by vancomycin or other antibiotics. When this happens, the bacteria are called resistant to vancomycin, and are known as vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE). This pamph…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Infection Prevention and Control
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci
Subjects (LCSH)
Enterococcus
Drug resistance in microorganisms
Specialty
Infectious Diseases
Abstract
Enterococci (plural of enterococcus) are bacteria that are commonly found in our bowel (gut). If enterococci travel to other parts of the body, they can cause an infection and make you sick. Antibiotics (such as vancomycin) are medications used to treat infections. Sometimes enterococci bacteria become unable to be destroyed by vancomycin or other antibiotics. When this happens, the bacteria are called resistant to vancomycin, and are known as vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE). This pamphlet identifies how VRE is spread, screening for VRE, care in hospital and at home, and infection prevention and control (IPAC) guidelines to prevent spreading VRE. The French version of this pamphlet 1857, "ERV (Entérocoques résistants à la vancomycine)", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Infection Prevention and Control
Pamphlet Number
1752
Less detail

What to eat after whipple surgery

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37492
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1366
Available Online
View Pamphlet
During Whipple surgery, parts of the stomach, small bowel, gallbladder, and pancreas are removed. These organs are important for digesting food. After surgery you may need to make some changes to your eating habits. Following the tips in this guide can help you get the nutrition you need to heal, feel comfortable during the first 4 weeks (1 month) after surgery, and keep or gain weight after surgery. Foods that are best tolerated and foods to avoid are listed. Other topics include whether you w…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nutrition and Food Services
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (10 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diet therapy
Postoperative Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Postoperative care
Gastrointestinal system
Specialty
Food and Nutrition
Abstract
During Whipple surgery, parts of the stomach, small bowel, gallbladder, and pancreas are removed. These organs are important for digesting food. After surgery you may need to make some changes to your eating habits. Following the tips in this guide can help you get the nutrition you need to heal, feel comfortable during the first 4 weeks (1 month) after surgery, and keep or gain weight after surgery. Foods that are best tolerated and foods to avoid are listed. Other topics include whether you will need to take pancreatic enzymes, what to do if your stomach is slow to empty, what to do if you get dumping syndrome, whether you will need to take vitamins after surgery, and what to do if you are losing weight. Recipes are included.
Responsibility
Nutrition and Food Services
Pamphlet Number
1366
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 1.