Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Arthroscopic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery : jaw joint surgery (outpatients)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams34731
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2024.
Pamphlet Number
1511
Available Online
View Pamphlet
The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is also called the jaw joint. TMJ surgery is done to treat problems with your jaw joints (like diseases that cause pain and limit your jaw movement). This pamphlet includes what to expect after surgery (like recovery area, eating and drinking, swelling, stitches, pain, and physio sticks). A list of symptoms that require you to call the oral surgery resident are listed.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2024
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (4 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Temporomandibular Joint - surgery
Arthroscopy
Subjects (LCSH)
Jaws--Surgery
Arthroscopy
Abstract
The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is also called the jaw joint. TMJ surgery is done to treat problems with your jaw joints (like diseases that cause pain and limit your jaw movement). This pamphlet includes what to expect after surgery (like recovery area, eating and drinking, swelling, stitches, pain, and physio sticks). A list of symptoms that require you to call the oral surgery resident are listed.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Pamphlet Number
1511
Less detail

Using your walking aid

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37310
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Physiotherapy. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1426
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Using a walking aid (like a cane, crutches, or a walker) will help you lower the amount of weight you put on your leg or let you avoid putting weight on your leg. Your primary health care provider will tell you how much weight you can put on your affected leg. This pamphlet explains how to use crutches, a walker, and a cane. It also explains how to increase the amount of weight on your affected leg.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Physiotherapy
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (13 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Walking
Crutches - use of
Walkers
Canes
Subjects (LCSH)
Walking
Crutches
Walkers (Orthopedic apparatus)
Staffs (Sticks, canes, etc.)
Specialty
Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation
Abstract
Using a walking aid (like a cane, crutches, or a walker) will help you lower the amount of weight you put on your leg or let you avoid putting weight on your leg. Your primary health care provider will tell you how much weight you can put on your affected leg. This pamphlet explains how to use crutches, a walker, and a cane. It also explains how to increase the amount of weight on your affected leg.
Notes
Previous title: Using Your Walking Aid: A Guide to Using Crutches or a Walker
Responsibility
Prepared by: Physiotherapy
Pamphlet Number
1426
Less detail