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Colour, sensation, and movement

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35439
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Same Day Surgery. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2017.
Pamphlet Number
0533
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Your nurse will be looking at your hand and/or foot often to check your circulation (blood flow) by looking at the colour, sensation (feeling) and movement of your hand and/or foot. A list of questions to expect is outlined.
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Same Day Surgery
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2017
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([3] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Blood Circulation
Hand - blood supply
Foot - blood supply
Subjects (LCSH)
Blood--Circulation
Blood flow
Abstract
Your nurse will be looking at your hand and/or foot often to check your circulation (blood flow) by looking at the colour, sensation (feeling) and movement of your hand and/or foot. A list of questions to expect is outlined.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Same Day Surgery, HI
Pamphlet Number
0533
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ECMO-extracorporeal life support in adults

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat33838
Fabio Sangalli, Nicolò Patroniti, Antonio Pesenti, editors. --Milan: Springer , c2014.
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Location
Online
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been in clinical use for some 40 years, but it is only in the past decade that its application in the treatment of life-threatening circulatory and respiratory failure has truly flourished. This book presents a comprehensive overview of both pathophysiological and practical aspects of circulatory and respiratory extracorporeal support. The basics of ECMO, including its history, the "ECMO team", cannulation, materials, and blood-surface interactions…
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Other Authors
Sangalli, Fabio
Patroniti, Nicolò
Pesenti, Antonio
Responsibility
Fabio Sangalli, Nicolò Patroniti, Antonio Pesenti, editors
Place of Publication
Milan
Publisher
Springer
Date of Publication
c2014
Physical Description
1 online resource (xii, 489 pages)
ISBN
9788847054271 (electronic bk.)
9788847054264
Subjects (MeSH)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Heart Diseases - therapy
Respiration, Artificial
Respiratory Tract Diseases - therapy
Subjects (LCSH)
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
Blood - Circulation, Artificial - Instruments
Oxygen - Physiological transport
Abstract
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been in clinical use for some 40 years, but it is only in the past decade that its application in the treatment of life-threatening circulatory and respiratory failure has truly flourished. This book presents a comprehensive overview of both pathophysiological and practical aspects of circulatory and respiratory extracorporeal support. The basics of ECMO, including its history, the "ECMO team", cannulation, materials, and blood-surface interactions, are first discussed. The various indications for and particular characteristics of circulatory and respiratory extracorporeal life support are then described in detail in the main part of the book. Patient care during ECMO and monitoring of the ECMO patient are also carefully covered, with explanation of the management of technical and clinical complications and transport-related problems. Further topics include long-term therapy options beyond ECMO, such as ventricular assist devices and transplants, outcome, the new frontiers of ECMO for organ procurement and future challenges.
Contents
Part I. History and Technical Aspects -- History of Extracorporeal Life Support -- Developing a New ECMO Program -- Basic Aspects of Physiology During ECMO Support -- Percutaneous Cannulation: Indication, Technique, and Complications -- Surgical Cannulation: Indication, Technique, and Complications -- Materials: Cannulas, Pumps, Oxygenators -- Coagulation, Anticoagulation, and Inflammatory Response -- Part II. ECMO for Circulatory Support -- Extracorporeal Life Support: Interactions with Normal Circulation -- ECMO for Ischemic Cardiogenic Shock -- ECMO for Refractory Cardiac Arrest -- ECMO for Postcardiotomic Shock -- ECMO in Myocarditis and Rare Cardiomyopathies -- ECMO for High-Risk Procedures -- ECMO for Severe Accidental Hypothermia -- ECMO in Drug Intoxication -- Newer Indications for ECMO: Pulmonary Embolism, Pulmonary Hypertension, Septic Shock and Trauma -- Left Ventricular Rest and Unloading During VA ECMO -- Weaning from Extracorporeal Circulatory Support -- Treatment Options for End-Stage Cardiac Failure -- Part III. ECMO for Respiratory Support -- Ventilatory Management of ARDS Before and During ECMO -- Respiratory Monitoring of the ECMO Patient -- Structure of an ECMO Network for Respiratory Support -- ECMO and Thoracic Surgery -- ECMO in the Awake/Extubated Patient -- ECMO as a Bridge to Lung Transplant -- Low-Flow ECMO and CO2 Removal -- Weaning from VV ECMO -- Part IV. ECMO for Organ Procurement -- Heart-Beating and Non-Heart-Beating Donors -- Lung Reconditioning -- Part V. Monitoring the ECMO Patient -- Patient Care During ECMO -- Echocardiography in Venoarterial and Venovenous ECMO -- Haemodynamic Monitoring -- Respiratory Monitoring During VA ECMO -- Neurological Monitoring During ECMO -- Monitoring the ECMO Patient: The Extracorporeal Circuit -- Part VI. Complications of ECMO -- Complications of Extracorporeal Support and Their Management -- Troubleshooting Common and Less Common Problems -- Part VII. Transport of the ECMO Patient -- Air Transport: Fixed-Wing and Helicopter -- Ground Transport: Ambulance -- Part VIII. Conclusion -- Newer Indications and Challenges.
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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The Heart and Circulation : An Integrative Model

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat45053
Branko Furst. (Second edition) --Cham: Springer , c2020.
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Location
Online
This extensively revised second edition traces the development of the basic concepts in cardiovascular physiology in light of the accumulated experimental and clinical evidence. It considers the early embryonic circulation, where blood circulation suggests the existence of a motive force, tightly coupled to the metabolic demands of the tissues. It proposes that rather than being an organ of propulsion, the heart, serves as an organ of control, generating pressure by rhythmically impeding blood …
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Author
Furst, Branko
Responsibility
Branko Furst
Edition
Second edition
Place of Publication
Cham
Publisher
Springer
Date of Publication
c2020
Physical Description
1 online resource (xl, 376 p.) : 136 illus., 105 illus. in color
ISBN
9783030250621
9783030250614 (Print ed.)
9783030250638 (Print ed.)
9783030250645 (Print ed.)
Subjects (MeSH)
Blood Circulation - physiology
Cardiovascular System - embryology
Heart - physiology
Hemodynamics - physiology
Myocardium
Specialty
Cardiology
Abstract
This extensively revised second edition traces the development of the basic concepts in cardiovascular physiology in light of the accumulated experimental and clinical evidence. It considers the early embryonic circulation, where blood circulation suggests the existence of a motive force, tightly coupled to the metabolic demands of the tissues. It proposes that rather than being an organ of propulsion, the heart, serves as an organ of control, generating pressure by rhythmically impeding blood flow. New and expanded chapters cover the arterial pulse, circulation in the upright posture, microcirculation and functional heart morphology. Heart and Circulation offers a new perspective for deeper understanding of the human cardiovascular system. It is therefore a thought-provoking resource for cardiologists, cardiac surgeons and trainees interested in models of human circulation.
Contents
Part I. Embryonic Circulation -- 1. Early Embryo Circulation -- 2. The Onset of Circulation -- 3. Hemodynamics of the Early Embryo Circulation -- 4. Flow Patterns in the Early Embryo Circulation -- 5. Is There a Circulation Without a Heart? -- 6. The Embryo Heart is Not a Peristaltic Pump -- 7. Flow Perturbation Experiments -- 8. Heart Rate Perturbations -- 9. The Heart as a Generator of Pressure -- 10. Ventriculo–Vascular Interaction -- 11. A Brief Comparative Phylogeny -- 12. Evolutionary Aspect of the Rhythmical System -- Part II. Mature Circulation -- 13. Functional Morphology of the Heart -- 14. Regulation of Cardiac Output -- 15. Circulatory and Respiratory Functions of the Blood -- 16. Models of the Heart -- 17. Cardiovascular Response During Exercise -- 18. Hemodynamic Effects of Aortic Occlusion -- 19. Increased Pulmonary Flows -- 20. Single Ventricle Physiology -- 21. Microcirculation -- Part III. Human Circulation -- 22. Arterial Pulse -- 23. Heartbeat and Respiration: Toward a Functional Chronobiology -- 24. The Effect of Gravity and Upright Posture on Circulation -- 25. The Integrative Model of Circulation: A Synthesis.
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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The heart and circulation : an integrative model

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat33285
Branko Furst. --London: Springer , c2014.
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Location
Online
What drives the circulation? In this comprehensive review of existing circulation models, the conventional view that the heart is a pressure-propulsion pump is challenged. The existing models fail to explain an increasing number of observed circulatory phenomena. A unifying circulation model is proposed in which the blood, responding to metabolic demands of the tissues, is the primary regulator of cardiac output. This new model arises from accumulated clinical and experimental evidence. The hea…
Available Online
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Author
Furst, Branko
Responsibility
Branko Furst
Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Springer
Date of Publication
c2014
Physical Description
1 online resource (xxix, 226 pages)
ISBN
9781447152774 (electronic bk.)
9781447152767
Subjects (MeSH)
Blood Circulation - physiology
Cardiovascular System - embryology
Heart - physiology
Hemodynamics - physiology
Myocardium
Subjects (LCSH)
Hemodynamics
Blood Circulation
Blood - Circulation
Cardiology
Abstract
What drives the circulation? In this comprehensive review of existing circulation models, the conventional view that the heart is a pressure-propulsion pump is challenged. The existing models fail to explain an increasing number of observed circulatory phenomena. A unifying circulation model is proposed in which the blood, responding to metabolic demands of the tissues, is the primary regulator of cardiac output. This new model arises from accumulated clinical and experimental evidence. The heart, rather than being an organ of blood propulsion, assumes a secondary role and generates pressure by impeding the flow of blood. This is supported by examples from the fields of early embryonic circulation, comparative phylogeny, functional morphology, exercise physiology and a range of clinical scenarios. The Heart and Circulation: An Integrative Model offers a paradigm shift in the understanding of circulatory phenomena. It will become a valuable resource for all those clinicians, researchers, educators and students who, having been confronted with the paradox of the circulation, are looking for a broader interpretation.
Contents
Part I. Embryonic Circulation -- Early Embryo Circulation -- The Onset of Circulation -- Hemodynamics of the Early Embryo Circulation -- Flow Patterns in the Early Embryo Circulation -- Is There a Circulation Without a Heart? -- Embryo Heart is not a Peristaltic Pump -- Flow Perturbation Experiments -- Heart Rate Perturbations -- The Heart as Generator of Pressure -- Ventriculo-Vascular Interaction -- A Brief Comparative Phylogeny -- Evolutionary Aspect of the Rhythmical System -- Part II. Mature Circulation -- Functional Morphology of the Heart -- Regulation of Cardiac Output -- Circulatory and Respiratory Functions of the Blood -- Models of the Heart -- Cardiovascular Response during Exercise -- Hemodynamic Effects of Aortic Occlusion -- Increased Pulmonary Flows -- Single Ventricle Physiology -- Blood as an Organ.
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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Vortex Formation in the Cardiovascular System

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat30879
Arash Kheradvar, Gianni Pedrizzetti. --London: Springer , c2012.
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Location
Online
Vortex formation has received much attention over the past few years. Vortices occur in nature wherever propulsive flow exists; from erupting volcanoes to the ones generated by squid and jellyfish to propel them. There has been particular interest in the wide variety of vortices that develop in the cardiovascular system, particularly in the cardiac chambers and in large arteries. These vortices play fundamental roles in the normal physiology and provide proper balance between blood motion and s…
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Author
Kheradvar, Arash
Other Authors
Pedrizzetti, Gianni
Responsibility
Arash Kheradvar, Gianni Pedrizzetti
Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Springer
Date of Publication
c2012
Physical Description
1 online resource (xiii, 164 p. : 75 ill., 42 ill. in color)
ISBN
9781447122883
Subjects (MeSH)
Blood Circulation - physiology
Hemodynamics - physiology
Subjects (LCSH)
Cardiology
Abstract
Vortex formation has received much attention over the past few years. Vortices occur in nature wherever propulsive flow exists; from erupting volcanoes to the ones generated by squid and jellyfish to propel them. There has been particular interest in the wide variety of vortices that develop in the cardiovascular system, particularly in the cardiac chambers and in large arteries. These vortices play fundamental roles in the normal physiology and provide proper balance between blood motion and stresses on the surrounding tissues. In contrast, formation of unnatural vortices may alter the momentum transfer in the blood flow and increase energy dissipation. Vortex Formation in the Cardiovascular System reviews the current knowledge of vortex formation, from the basic physics to cardiac physiology. There is a particular focus on the formation of vortices at different locations inside the heart, the effect of cardiac devices and surgery on vortex formation, fluid dynamics of the artificial heart valves and ventricular assist devices. The Authors have translated physical, mathematical and engineering concepts related to vortex formation into a clinical perspective with the objective to advance cardiovascular patient care. This book therefore represents a comprehensive and valuable resource for those involved in the field of cardiology and cardiovascular physiology, cardiovascular surgeons, interventional cardiologists, medical bioengineers and researchers in fluid mechanics.
Contents
[Machine generated contents note] 1. Fundamental Fluid Mechanics -- 1.1. Fluids and Solids, Blood and Tissues -- 1.2. Conservation of Mass -- 1.3. Conservation of Momentum and Bernoulli Theorem -- 1.4. Conservation of Momentum and Viscosity -- 1.5. Boundary Layer and Wall Shear Stress -- 1.6. Simple Flows and Concepts of Cardiovascular Interest -- References -- 2. Vortex Dynamics -- 2.1. Definitions -- 2.2. Dynamics of Vorticity -- 2.3. Boundary Layer Separation -- 2.4. Vortex Formation -- 2.5. Three-Dimensional Vortex Formation -- 2.6. Energy Loss and Force of Vortex Formation -- 2.7. Vortex Interactions -- 2.8. Mention to Turbulence -- References -- 3. Vortex Formation in the Heart -- 3.1. Mitral Valve and Transmitral Flow -- 3.1.1. Mitral Valve Functional Anatomy -- 3.1.2. Transmitral Flow -- 3.1.3. Transmitral Vortex Formation -- 3.1.4. Transmitral Vortex Formation Time Index: A Parameter to Couple Diastole and Systole -- 3.1.5. Mitral Annulus Recoil -- 3.1.6. Grading Diastolic Dysfunction -- 3.1.7. Outcome Planning for Diastolic Dysfunction -- 3.2. Aortic Valve and Sinuses of Valsalva -- 3.2.1. Functional Anatomy -- 3.2.2. Vortex Formation in Aortic Sinus -- 3.3. Vortex Formation in the Right Heart -- 3.4. Vortex Formation in the Embryonic Heart -- 3.5. Linking Cardiac Muscle Function to Vortex Formation -- 3.5.1. Preejection -- 3.5.2. Ejection -- 3.5.3. Isovolumic Relaxation -- 3.5.4. Early and Late Diastole -- 3.6. Effect of Left Ventricular Diseases on Vortex Formation -- 3.6.1. Vortex Formation in LV Systolic Dysfunction -- 3.6.2. Vortex Formation in LV Regional Myocardial Dysfunction -- 3.6.3. Hypertrophic Left Ventricle and Diastolic Dysfunction -- 3.6.4. Vortex Formation in Mitral Stenosis -- 3.6.5. Vortex Formation Time Index and Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvotomy -- References -- 4. Effect of Cardiac Devices and Surgery on Vortex Formation -- 4.1. Vortex Formation in Presence of Bioprosthetic Heart Valves -- 4.1.1. Mitral Bioprosthetic Valves -- 4.1.2. Aortic Bioprosthetic Valves -- 4.2. Vortex Formation in Presence of Mechanical Heart Valves (MHVs) -- 4.2.1. Study of MHVs’ Hemodynamics -- 4.2.2. Types of MHVs -- 4.2.3. Flow Across Mono-leaflet MHVs (MMHVs) -- 4.2.4. Orientation of MMHVs -- 4.2.5. Flow Across Bileaflet MHV (BMHV) -- 4.2.6. Consequence of Fluid Dynamics Experiments on Design of BMHVs -- 4.2.7. BMHVs at Aortic Position -- 4.2.8. BMHVs at Mitral Position -- 4.3. Vortical Flow Structures in Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) -- 4.3.1. Classification of VADs -- 4.3.2. Pulsatile VAD Hemodynamics -- 4.3.3. Valves in the VAD -- 4.3.4. VAD Chamber -- 4.3.5. Continuous Flow VADs (CF VADs) -- 4.3.6. Hemodynamics of VADs Cannulation -- 4.4. Vortex Formation due to Arterial Surgery and Anastomosis -- 4.4.1. Fontan Procedure -- 4.4.2. Anastomoses -- References -- 5. Diagnostic Vortex Imaging -- 5.1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging -- 5.1.1. Velocity Measurements Using MRI -- 5.1.2. Visualization and Quantification -- 5.1.3. Future Developments -- 5.2. Echocardiography -- 5.2.1. Blood Flow Visualization Using Echocardiography -- 5.2.2. Color Doppler -- 5.2.3. Contrast Enhanced Imaging and Echo-PIV -- 5.2.4. Future Developments -- 5.3. In Vitro Experiments -- 5.3.1. Particle Image Velocimetry -- 5.3.2. Heart-Flow Simulator and Reproduction of Cardiac Cycles -- 5.3.3. Experimental Characterization of the Vortex Formation -- 5.3.4. Influence of Transmitral Vortex Formation on Mitral Annulus Dynamics -- 5.3.5. Conclusive Remarks -- 5.4. Numerical Simulation -- 5.4.1. Fundamentals Elements of Numerical Simulations -- 5.4.2. Fluid-Structure Interaction -- 5.5. Conclusion -- References.
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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