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Anophthalmia : The Expert's Guide to Medical and Surgical Management

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat44856
Thomas E. Johnson, editor. --Cham: Springer , c2020.
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Location
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This book provides a comprehensive review on the surgical care of patients requiring removal of an eye, as well as consequent functional and cosmetic rehabilitation. In addition to covering the crafting of ocular prosthetics, Anophthalmia: The Expert's Guide to Medical and Surgical Management also addresses the psychological and physical adjustments to losing an eye, and adapting to that loss. Divided into five parts, Anophthalmia functions as a go-to reference for ophthalmologists and oculopla…
Available Online
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Other Authors
Johnson, Thomas E.
Responsibility
Thomas E. Johnson, editor
Place of Publication
Cham
Publisher
Springer
Date of Publication
c2020
Physical Description
1 online resource (xiv, 306 p.) : 165 illus., 155 illus. in color
ISBN
9783030297534
9783030297527 (Print ed.)
9783030297541 (Print ed.)
9783030297558 (Print ed.)
Subjects (MeSH)
Anophthalmos
Eye Enucleation
Eye, Artificial
Orbit Evisceration
Orbital Implants
Surgery, Plastic - methods
Specialty
Ophthalmology
Abstract
This book provides a comprehensive review on the surgical care of patients requiring removal of an eye, as well as consequent functional and cosmetic rehabilitation. In addition to covering the crafting of ocular prosthetics, Anophthalmia: The Expert's Guide to Medical and Surgical Management also addresses the psychological and physical adjustments to losing an eye, and adapting to that loss. Divided into five parts, Anophthalmia functions as a go-to reference for ophthalmologists and oculoplastic surgeons. The book begins by laying out the clinical foundations and history of anophthalmia. Part II and III discuss surgical removal techniques, prosthesis fitting and maintenance, congenital anophthalmia, infections and inflammations, and newer surgical techniques such as osseointegration after orbital exenteration. Finally, the book concludes with chapters on prosthetic options including scleral shells, keratopigmentation procedures, and cosmetic contact lenses. Unique in content, Anophthalmia is a vital resource for practicing ophthalmologists, oculoplastic surgeons, and all medical professionals who care for patients with surgical and traumatic loss of the eye and orbital tissues. Additionally, sufficient detail and explanation make this work accessible to those in training, such as medical students, ophthalmology residents, and fellows.
Contents
Part I. Clinical Foundations -- 1. Introduction & Historical Perspectives -- 2. Clinical Decision Making -- 3. Sympathetic Ophthalmia -- 4. Psychological and Cognitive Adjustment to Visual Loss -- 5. History of Ocular Implants -- Part II. Surgical Techniques -- 6. Enucleation and Techniques of Orbital Implant Placement -- 7. Evisceration -- 8. Exenteration and Multidisciplinary Approaches -- 9. Orbital Implants and Wrapping Materials -- 10. Osseous Integration After Exenteration -- Part III. The Anophthalmic Socket -- 11. Maintenance of the Anophthalmic Socket -- 12. Anophthalmic Socket Syndrome -- 13. Socket Inflammation & Infection -- 14. Management of Implant Exposure & Extrusion -- 15. Secondary Orbital Implant Techniques -- 16. Management of the Contracted Socket -- 17. Socket Malignancy -- 18. Cosmetic Interventions in Anophthalmia -- Part IV. Pediatrics & Oncology -- 19. Congenital Anophthalmos (CA) -- 20. Retinoblastoma and Uveal Melanoma -- 21. Strategies for Orbital Expansion -- Part V. Prosthetics -- 22. Scleral Shells -- 23. Keratopigmentation (Corneal Tattoo) and Prosthetic Contact Lenses -- 24. Making an Ocular Prosthesis.
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Eye Care Centre. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0582
Available Online
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Your health care provider has talked with you about why your eye or the contents of your eye must be removed. This pamphlet will help you learn how to safely care for yourself after your procedure. The medical term for eye removal is enucleation. The medical term for removing the contents of the eye and leaving the outer coat (sclera) behind is evisceration. Both procedures mean permanent loss of the eye. This pamphlet explains what will happen before and after your surgery, including wearing a…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Eye Care Centre
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (8 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Eye Enucleation
Eye Evisceration
Subjects (LCSH)
Eye--Enucleation
Specialty
Ophthalmology
Abstract
Your health care provider has talked with you about why your eye or the contents of your eye must be removed. This pamphlet will help you learn how to safely care for yourself after your procedure. The medical term for eye removal is enucleation. The medical term for removing the contents of the eye and leaving the outer coat (sclera) behind is evisceration. Both procedures mean permanent loss of the eye. This pamphlet explains what will happen before and after your surgery, including wearing a dressing, medication, care at home, and emotions you may have. Information about having a prosthesis (artificial eye) is given. A list of symptoms that require immediate medical attention is provided. The French version of this pamphlet 1897, "Ablation de l’oeil", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Eye Care Centre
Pamphlet Number
0582
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Ablation de l’oeil

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36457
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Eye Care Centre. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1897
Available Online
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Vous et votre médecin avez parlé des raisons pour lesquelles il est nécessaire d’enlever votre œil ou le contenu du globe oculaire. Ce dépliant explique comment prendre soin de vous en toute sécurité. L’énucléation est le terme médical qui désigne le retrait ou l’ablation de l’œil. Le terme médical utilisé pour parler du retrait du contenu du globe oculaire en conservant la couche externe (coque sclérale ou sclère) est éviscération. Les deux interventions entraînent la perte permanente de l’œil…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Eye Care Centre
Alternate Title
Eye removal
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document (10 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Eye Enucleation
Eye Evisceration
Subjects (LCSH)
Eye--Enucleation
Specialty
Ophthalmology
Abstract
Vous et votre médecin avez parlé des raisons pour lesquelles il est nécessaire d’enlever votre œil ou le contenu du globe oculaire. Ce dépliant explique comment prendre soin de vous en toute sécurité. L’énucléation est le terme médical qui désigne le retrait ou l’ablation de l’œil. Le terme médical utilisé pour parler du retrait du contenu du globe oculaire en conservant la couche externe (coque sclérale ou sclère) est éviscération. Les deux interventions entraînent la perte permanente de l’œil. Ce dépliant explique ce qui se passe avant et après la chirurgie, le port d’une chemise d’hôpital, les médicaments, les soins à la maison ainsi que vos émotions. Vous y trouverez de plus des informations sur les prothèses oculaires (œil artificiel) ainsi qu’une liste des symptômes nécessitant une consultation médicale immédiate.
This pamphlet is a French translation of "Eye Removal" pamphlet 0582. Your health care provider has talked with you about why your eye or the contents of your eye must be removed. This pamphlet will help you learn how to safely care for yourself after your procedure. The medical term for eye removal is enucleation. The medical term for removing the contents of the eye and leaving the outer coat (sclera) behind is evisceration. Both procedures mean permanent loss of the eye. This pamphlet explains what will happen before and after your surgery, including wearing a dressing, medication, care at home, and emotions you may have. Information about having a prosthesis (artificial eye) is given. A list of symptoms that require immediate medical attention is provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Eye Care Centre
Pamphlet Number
1897
Less detail