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Reproductive Ethics II : New Ideas and Innovations

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat42543
Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Paul Burcher, editors. --Cham: Springer , c2018.
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This book is the second collection of essays on reproductive ethics from Drs. Campo-Engelstein and Burcher. This volume is unique in that it is both timely and includes several essays on new technologies, while also being a comprehensive review of most of the major questions in the field, from racial disparities in reproductive healthcare to gene editing and the possibility of the creation of a transhuman species. The scholars writing these essays are pre-eminent in their fields, and their back…
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Other Authors
Campo-Engelstein, Lisa
Burcher, Paul
Responsibility
Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Paul Burcher, editors
Place of Publication
Cham
Publisher
Springer
Date of Publication
c2018
Physical Description
1 online resource (xi, 193 p.) : 2 illus. in color
ISBN
9783319894294
9783319894287 (print ed.)
9783319894300 (print ed.)
Subjects (MeSH)
Bioethical Issues
Reproductive Health
Reproductive Rights
Reproduction - ethics
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - ethics
Specialty
Ethics
Reproductive Medicine
Abstract
This book is the second collection of essays on reproductive ethics from Drs. Campo-Engelstein and Burcher. This volume is unique in that it is both timely and includes several essays on new technologies, while also being a comprehensive review of most of the major questions in the field, from racial disparities in reproductive healthcare to gene editing and the possibility of the creation of a transhuman species. The scholars writing these essays are pre-eminent in their fields, and their backgrounds are quite varied, including philosophers, anthropologists, physicians, and professors of law. Reproductive ethics remains an underdeveloped area of bioethics despite the recent technological breakthroughs that carry both great promise and potential threats. Building on the first volume of work from a conference held just over one year ago, this new collection of essays from a conference held April 2017 continues this discussion as well as provides ethical insights and reviews of these emerging technologies. The ethical questions swirling around human reproduction are both old and new, but the conference presentations, and the essays derived from them, focus on new ways of appreciating old arguments such as the ethics of abortion, as well as new ways of seeing new technologies such as CRISPR and mitochondrial transfer.
Contents
Reproductive Ethics: Introduction -- Part I. Genetics, Eugenics, and Reproduction -- Frankenstein and the Question of Children’s Rights After Human Germline Genetic Modification -- The Ethical Complexity of Using Whole-Exome Sequencing to Detect Adult-Onset Conditions in the Prenatal and Pediatric Settings -- Creating a Higher Breed: Transhumanism and the Prophecy of Anglo-American Eugenics -- Part II. Exploring Infertility and the Right to Reproduce -- One Is the Loneliest Number: How the WHO’s Redefinition of Infertility Provokes Contestations of the Body and the Body Politic -- Expanding the Clinical Definition of Infertility to Include Socially Infertile Individuals and Couples -- Social Responses to the Environmental Impact of Reproduction in the Global West: A Critique of Christine Overall’s “Overpopulation and Extinction” -- Part III. Reflections on Assisted Reproductive Technologies -- Decentering Whiteness in Feminist Bioethics: Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) as an Illustrative Case -- New Pitchforks and Furtive Nature -- Assisted Reproductive Technology and the Proliferation of Parents: The More, the Merrier? -- Part IV. Reproductive Perspectives, Practices, and Education -- Reconceiving the Human Fetus in Reproductive Bioethics: Perspectives from Cultural Anthropology and Bioarchaeology -- The Ethics of Evangelism: Why You Can’t Be a Good Physician and Support Crisis Pregnancy Centers -- Doulas as Agents of Reproductive Justice Who Promote of Women’s International Human Rights: An Evidence-Based Review and Comparative Case Study Between Brazil and the United States -- Reproductive Flourishing: A Framework for Teaching Reproductive Ethics in Clinical Education.
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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Toward a Small Family Ethic : How Overpopulation and Climate Change Are Affecting the Morality of Procreation

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat40251
Travis N. Rieder. --Cham: Springer , c2016.
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This thought-provoking treatise argues that current human fertility rates are fueling a public health crisis that is at once local and global. Its analysis and data summarize the ecological costs of having children, presenting ethical dilemmas for prospective parents in an era of competition for scarce resources, huge disparities of wealth and poverty, and unsustainable practices putting irreparable stress on the planet. Questions of individual responsibility and integrity as well as personal m…
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Author
Rieder, Travis N
Responsibility
Travis N. Rieder
Place of Publication
Cham
Publisher
Springer
Date of Publication
c2016
Physical Description
1 online resource (x, 68 p.)
Series Title
SpringerBriefs in public health
ISBN
9783319338712
9783319338699 (print ed.)
ISSN
2192-3698
2192-3701 (e)
Subjects (MeSH)
Climate Change
Family Planning Policy
Population Density
Reproduction - ethics
Reproductive Rights
Abstract
This thought-provoking treatise argues that current human fertility rates are fueling a public health crisis that is at once local and global. Its analysis and data summarize the ecological costs of having children, presenting ethical dilemmas for prospective parents in an era of competition for scarce resources, huge disparities of wealth and poverty, and unsustainable practices putting irreparable stress on the planet. Questions of individual responsibility and integrity as well as personal moral and procreative issues are examined carefully against larger and more long-range concerns. The author's assertion that even modest efforts toward reducing global fertility rates would help curb carbon emissions, slow rising global temperatures, and forestall large-scale climate disaster is well reasoned and more than plausible. Among the topics covered: The multiplier effect: food, water, energy, and climate. The role of population in mitigating climate change. The carbon legacy of procreation. Obligations to our possible children. Rights, what is right, and the right to do wrong. The moral burden to have small families. Toward a Small Family Ethic sounds a clarion call for bioethics students and working bioethicists. This brief, thought-rich volume steers readers toward challenges that need to be met, and consequences that will need to be addressed if they are not.
Contents
1. Global Population and Public Health -- 2. What Can I Do? Small Effects and the Collective Action Worry -- 3. Individual Obligation -- 4. Challenges to Procreative Obligation -- 5. Toward a Small Family Ethic.
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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