Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

My physical activity record

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams38229
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Primary Health Care. Hants Health and Wellness Team. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2023.
Pamphlet Number
2372
Available Online
View Pamphlet
This pamphlet includes tips on how to get more physically active. It also includes space to keep track of your health (like blood pressure, heart rate) and activity (like aerobic exercise, balance test).
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Primary Health Care. Hants Health and Wellness Team
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2023
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([6] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Physical fitness
Subjects (LCSH)
Exercise
Specialty
Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation
Abstract
This pamphlet includes tips on how to get more physically active. It also includes space to keep track of your health (like blood pressure, heart rate) and activity (like aerobic exercise, balance test).
Responsibility
Prepared by: Hants Health and Wellness Team, Primary Health Care
Pamphlet Number
2372
Less detail

Having a urinary stent : after urological or endoscopic surgery

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37440
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Urology Department. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0584
Available Online
View Pamphlet
This pamphlet explains what to expect if you are going home with a ureteral stent inserted. It explains how long you will have the stent, how it is put in, care instructions, removal, and possible side effects. It lists what to do if your stent moves out of place, how it may affect daily activities, and whether it will increase your risk of urinary track infections (UTIs). A list of symptoms that need emergency medical attention is listed.
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Urology Department
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (9 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Stents
Subjects (LCSH)
Stents (Surgery)
Specialty
Urogenital System
Abstract
This pamphlet explains what to expect if you are going home with a ureteral stent inserted. It explains how long you will have the stent, how it is put in, care instructions, removal, and possible side effects. It lists what to do if your stent moves out of place, how it may affect daily activities, and whether it will increase your risk of urinary track infections (UTIs). A list of symptoms that need emergency medical attention is listed.
Notes
Previous title: After stent insertion
Responsibility
Prepared by: Urology Department, QEII
Pamphlet Number
0584
Less detail

Enhancing your recovery after cardiac surgery : steps you can take to get better sooner

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36520
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Maritime Heart Center. ERAS Team. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2019.
Pamphlet Number
1968
Available Online
View Pamphlet
After cardiac surgery, there are lots of things you can do to speed up your recovery such as: being as fit as possible before your surgery, lowering the stress of surgery on your body, and getting up and moving soon after your surgery. This pamphlet explains how to do these things. Topics include: eating well, staying active, doing your exercises, practicing post-surgery restrictions, getting ready for surgery, steps to help your recovery while in hospital, and what to expect after you leave th…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Maritime Heart Center. ERAS Team
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2019
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (22 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Cardiovascular Diseases - surgery
Postoperative Care
Subjects (LCSH)
Cardiovascular system--Surgery
Postoperative care
Abstract
After cardiac surgery, there are lots of things you can do to speed up your recovery such as: being as fit as possible before your surgery, lowering the stress of surgery on your body, and getting up and moving soon after your surgery. This pamphlet explains how to do these things. Topics include: eating well, staying active, doing your exercises, practicing post-surgery restrictions, getting ready for surgery, steps to help your recovery while in hospital, and what to expect after you leave the hospital. A diary is given to help you keep track of your recovery goals. A feedback form is also listed.
Responsibility
Prepared by: ERAS Team
Pamphlet Number
1968
Less detail

High blood pressure in pregnancy - South Shore Regional Hospital

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37588
Nova Scotia Health Authority. South Shore Regional Hospital. Women and Children's Health Program. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2022.
Pamphlet Number
2285
Available Online
View Pamphlet
High blood pressure in pregnancy (also called gestational hypertension) is a blood pressure (BP) that stays higher than 140/90 (140 over 90). For most people, a normal blood pressure is 140/90 or less. After week 20 of your pregnancy, high blood pressure can be linked to pre-eclampsia. This is a more serious condition that includes high blood pressure and protein in the urine (pee). Because pre-eclampsia can be dangerous to you and your baby, we ask you to monitor your blood pressure and sympto…
Available Online
View Pamphlet
Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. South Shore Regional Hospital. Women and Children's Health Program
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2022
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Hypertension
Pregnancy
Subjects (LCSH)
Hypertension
Pregnancy
Specialty
Gynecology
Abstract
High blood pressure in pregnancy (also called gestational hypertension) is a blood pressure (BP) that stays higher than 140/90 (140 over 90). For most people, a normal blood pressure is 140/90 or less. After week 20 of your pregnancy, high blood pressure can be linked to pre-eclampsia. This is a more serious condition that includes high blood pressure and protein in the urine (pee). Because pre-eclampsia can be dangerous to you and your baby, we ask you to monitor your blood pressure and symptoms. This pamphlet explains the symptoms to watch for if you have high blood pressure, how to check your blood pressure at home, and symptoms that require medical attention right away. Contact information for the OBS Clinic and OBS Unit, and sheets to keep track of your blood pressure are included.
Responsibility
Prepared by: South Shore Regional Hospital, Women and Children’s Health Program
Pamphlet Number
2285
Less detail