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Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2019.
Pamphlet Number
0112
Available Online
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Depo-Provera is an injectable (given by needle) form of hormones similar to the natural progesterone made by your ovaries each month. It is used to prevent pregnancy. This pamphlet explains how Depo-Provera works, how well it works, how to get it, when it starts working, pros and cons, who should not take it, and certain things to remember when taking it. Depo-Provera will not protect you against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A list of resources is provided if you have any questions. …
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2019
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Medroxyprogesterone Acetate
Contraception - methods
Subjects (LCSH)
Medroxyprogesterone
Contraception
Abstract
Depo-Provera is an injectable (given by needle) form of hormones similar to the natural progesterone made by your ovaries each month. It is used to prevent pregnancy. This pamphlet explains how Depo-Provera works, how well it works, how to get it, when it starts working, pros and cons, who should not take it, and certain things to remember when taking it. Depo-Provera will not protect you against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A list of resources is provided if you have any questions. The French version of this pamphlet 2016, "Depo-Provera", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic
Pamphlet Number
0112
Less detail

Birth control pills

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36525
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2019.
Pamphlet Number
0171
Available Online
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Birth control pills work to prevent pregnancy by stopping you from ovulating, thickening the mucus made by your cervix, and changing the lining of your uterus. This pamphlet explains how well the pill works, when it starts working, pros and cons, how to take it, what can change how well it works, instructions for missed pills, and possible side effects (as well as serious ones to be aware of). The pill is not prescribed to women over 35 who smoke due to the risks involved. The pill will not pro…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic
Alternate Title
The pill
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2019
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (9 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Ovulation Inhibition
Contraception - methods
Subjects (LCSH)
Oral contraceptives
Contraception
Abstract
Birth control pills work to prevent pregnancy by stopping you from ovulating, thickening the mucus made by your cervix, and changing the lining of your uterus. This pamphlet explains how well the pill works, when it starts working, pros and cons, how to take it, what can change how well it works, instructions for missed pills, and possible side effects (as well as serious ones to be aware of). The pill is not prescribed to women over 35 who smoke due to the risks involved. The pill will not protect you against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The French version of this pamphlet 2027, "La pilule contraceptive", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic
Pamphlet Number
0171
Less detail

Birth control patch

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36526
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2019.
Pamphlet Number
0255
Available Online
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The birth control patch is a patch that you place on your skin once a week. It has 2 hormones, estrogen and progesterone, which are absorbed (taken in) through the skin. It is used to prevent pregnancy. This pamphlet explains how the patch works, how well it works, pros and cons, possible side effects (as well as serious ones to be aware of), who should not use it, how to use it, and where to put it on your body. Instructions for what to do if you forget to start or change a patch, or if it fal…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2019
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (13 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Transdermal Patch
Ovulation Inhibition
Contraception - methods
Subjects (LCSH)
Transdermal medication
Contraception
Abstract
The birth control patch is a patch that you place on your skin once a week. It has 2 hormones, estrogen and progesterone, which are absorbed (taken in) through the skin. It is used to prevent pregnancy. This pamphlet explains how the patch works, how well it works, pros and cons, possible side effects (as well as serious ones to be aware of), who should not use it, how to use it, and where to put it on your body. Instructions for what to do if you forget to start or change a patch, or if it falls off (partly or completely) is given. A list of what can make it less effective is provided. The patch is not prescribed to women over 35 who smoke due to the risks involved. The patch will not protect you against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The French version of this pamphlet 2026, "Le timbre contraceptif", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Women's Choice Clinic
Pamphlet Number
0255
Less detail

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) Clinic

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams35018
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Central Zone. STI Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
1149
Available Online
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An STI is an infection that is spread through sexual contact. Most STIs can be treated very easily. However, if left untreated, many can cause problems later. This pamphlet explains common symptoms of STIs, how we test for and treat STIs, what has changed with the STI Clinic, how to make an appointment, what to do if you just want to be screened for STIs, and what to expect at the Clinic. The STI Clinic's location and hours are also provided.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Central Zone. STI Clinic
Alternate Title
STD Clinic
Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (5 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Sexually Tranmitted Diseases
Subjects (LCSH)
Sexually transmitted diseases
Specialty
Infectious Diseases
Abstract
An STI is an infection that is spread through sexual contact. Most STIs can be treated very easily. However, if left untreated, many can cause problems later. This pamphlet explains common symptoms of STIs, how we test for and treat STIs, what has changed with the STI Clinic, how to make an appointment, what to do if you just want to be screened for STIs, and what to expect at the Clinic. The STI Clinic's location and hours are also provided.
Responsibility
Prepared by: STI Clinic, QEII, Halifax
Pamphlet Number
1149
Less detail

Eye infections in newborns caused by gonorrhea and chlamydia

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36641
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Maternal Child Provincial Policy Working Group. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2020.
Pamphlet Number
2050
Available Online
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Gonorrhea (“gah-nuh-REE-uh”) and chlamydia (“kluh-MID-ee-uh”) are common sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Gonorrhea and chlamydia are bacteria that can be passed from an infected pregnant woman to their baby during birth. Both gonorrhea and chlamydia can cause eye infections in newborns. Although newborn eye infections caused by gonorrhea and chlamydia are rare, they are serious and must be treated quickly to avoid long-term complications. Signs of a newborn eye infection caused by gonor…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Maternal Child Provincial Policy Working Group
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2020
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([2] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Ophthalmia Neonatorum - prevention & control
Subjects (LCSH)
Conjunctivitis, Infantile
Abstract
Gonorrhea (“gah-nuh-REE-uh”) and chlamydia (“kluh-MID-ee-uh”) are common sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Gonorrhea and chlamydia are bacteria that can be passed from an infected pregnant woman to their baby during birth. Both gonorrhea and chlamydia can cause eye infections in newborns. Although newborn eye infections caused by gonorrhea and chlamydia are rare, they are serious and must be treated quickly to avoid long-term complications. Signs of a newborn eye infection caused by gonorrhea or chlamydia are usually seen within the first week or two after birth.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Maternal Child Provincial Policy Working Group
Pamphlet Number
2050
Less detail

Urinary tract infection (UTI)

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams34408
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Emergency Department. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0396
Available Online
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Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can happen when bacteria (germs) get into the urinary tract. The urinary tract is made up of your kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. UTIs are not sexually transmitted (partners do not spread the bacteria (germs) to each other). This pamphlet explains the signs of a UTI, how UTIs are treated, what you can do to help, what you can do for pain, and how to lower your chance of infection in the future. Symptoms that require medical assistance are listed.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Emergency Department
Alternate Title
UTI
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (4 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Urinary Tract Infections - prevention & control
Subjects (LCSH)
Urinary tract infections
Specialty
Emergency
Urogenital System
Abstract
Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can happen when bacteria (germs) get into the urinary tract. The urinary tract is made up of your kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. UTIs are not sexually transmitted (partners do not spread the bacteria (germs) to each other). This pamphlet explains the signs of a UTI, how UTIs are treated, what you can do to help, what you can do for pain, and how to lower your chance of infection in the future. Symptoms that require medical assistance are listed.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Emergency Department, QEII
Pamphlet Number
0396
Less detail

Internal and external condoms

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams37442
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Choice Clinic. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
1039
Available Online
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Condoms are birth control devices that prevent semen (the fluid that contains sperm) from entering a vagina or anus. When semen is released inside a vagina, it may reach an egg and fertilize it, causing pregnancy. Condoms also help prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, if used properly. There are 2 types of condoms: internal (worn on the inside of the vagina or anus) and external (worn on the outside of an erect penis). This pamphlet explains what internal…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Nova Scotia Choice Clinic
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document (6 p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Contraception - methods
Subjects (LCSH)
Contraception
Specialty
Gynecology
Abstract
Condoms are birth control devices that prevent semen (the fluid that contains sperm) from entering a vagina or anus. When semen is released inside a vagina, it may reach an egg and fertilize it, causing pregnancy. Condoms also help prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, if used properly. There are 2 types of condoms: internal (worn on the inside of the vagina or anus) and external (worn on the outside of an erect penis). This pamphlet explains what internal and external condoms are, how they work, how well they work to prevent pregnancy, what to do if a condom breaks during vaginal sex, and what to do if your partner does not want to use a condom. A link to the The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada website is provided for further information.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Nova Scotia Choice Clinic
Pamphlet Number
1039
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7 records – page 1 of 1.