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Brain norepinephrine : neurobiology and therapeutics

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat27288
edited by Gregory A. Ordway, Michael A. Schwartz, Alan Frazer. --Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press , 2007.
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Location
Online
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Author
Ordway, Gregory A
Other Authors
Schwartz, Michael A
Frazer, Alan
Responsibility
edited by Gregory A. Ordway, Michael A. Schwartz, Alan Frazer
Place of Publication
Cambridge, UK
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Date of Publication
2007
Physical Description
642 p.
ISBN
6610815321
Subjects (MeSH)
Norepinephrine
Contents
Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Contributors -- Acknowledgements and Disclosures -- Introduction: revision of an old transmitter -- Part I The neurobiology of norepinephrine -- 1 Neuroanatomical and chemical organization of the locus coeruleus -- Early history of the locus coeruleus -- Species comparisons -- Ontogeny -- Morphological and ultrastructural characteristics -- Transmitter identity and receptor distribution -- Connections: sources of afferent input to LC -- The LC efferent projection -- Chemoarchitecture: neurochemically identified pathways -- Overview -- REFERENCES -- 2 Interactions of norepinephrine with other neurotransmitter systems: anatomical basis and pharmacology -- Introduction -- Noradrenergic circuitry: input to the LC -- Noradrenergic circuitry: reciprocal output from the LC -- Summary and conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- REFERENCES -- 3 Receptors for norepinephrine and signal transduction pathways -- Introduction -- Adrenergic receptor subtypes -- Characteristics of alpha1-adrenergic receptors -- Characteristics of alpha2-adrenergic receptors -- Characteristics of beta-adrenergic receptors -- Signal transduction pathways -- Physiological roles -- Conclusions/summary -- REFERENCES -- 4 Regulation of gene transcription in the central nervous system by norepinephrine -- Introduction -- Fundamental concepts of gene transcription -- Noradrenergic receptors couple to multiple signal transduction cascades and transcription factors -- Role of noradrenergic receptor regulation of transcription factors and gene expression in the actions of antidepressant treatment -- Antidepressants and norepinephrine regulation of c-fos gene expression and AP-1 DNA binding -- Role of NE-CREB signaling in learning and memory -- Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- REFERENCES -- 5 The norepinephrine transporter and regulation of synaptic transmission -- Introduction -- The norepinephrine transporter and the importance of norepinephrine uptake -- Regulation of norepinephrine uptake -- Norepinephrine transporter-associated proteins -- Norepinephrine transporter gene, polymorphisms and splice variants -- Clearance of norepinephrine and aging -- Norepinephrine transport and disease -- Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- References -- Part II Norepinephrine and behavior -- 6 Role of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system in arousal and circadian regulation of the sleep-wake cycle -- Introduction -- Brain systems involved in sleep-wake regulation -- LC involvement in sleep-wake regulation -- Role of corticotropin-releasing factor in noradrenergic regulation of sleep and waking -- Role of LC in circadian regulation of sleep and waking -- Clinical perspectives: LC participation in sleep alterations due to clinical pathologies -- Conclusions -- REFERENCES -- 7 The locus coeruleus and regulation of behavioral flexibility and attention: clinical implications -- Introduction -- Background -- Recent results recording LC neurons in behaving monkeys -- Computational modeling: simulation of LC activity and task performance -- Decision-related activation of monkey LC neurons -- Influence of prefrontal cortex on activity of LC neurons -- Discussion -- Clinical implications -- Hypertonic LC activity: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and posttraumatic stre
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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Issues in clinical epileptology : a view from the bench

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/provcat33358
Helen E. Scharfman, Paul S. Buckmaster, editors. --Dordrecht: Springer , c2014.
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Location
Online
Available Online
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Other Authors
Scharfman, Helen E
Buckmaster, Paul S
Responsibility
Helen E. Scharfman, Paul S. Buckmaster, editors
Place of Publication
Dordrecht
Publisher
Springer
Date of Publication
c2014
Physical Description
1 online resource (xxi, 339 pages)
Series Vol.
v. 813
Series Title
Advances in experimental medicine and biology
ISBN
9789401789141 (electronic bk.)
9789401789134
Subjects (MeSH)
Epilepsy
Subjects (LCSH)
Epilepsy - Research
Notes
Festschrift for Philip A. Schwartzkroin.
Contents
Part I. Seizures, Epileptiform Activities, and Regional Localization -- 1. How Can We Identify Ictal and Interictal Abnormal Activity? -- 2. What Is the Clinical Relevance of In Vitro Epileptiform Activity? -- 3. What Is the Importance of Abnormal "Background" Activity in Seizure Generation? -- 4. What Is a Seizure Focus? -- 5. What Is a Seizure Network? Long-Range Network Consequences of Focal Seizures -- 6. What Is a Seizure Network? Very Fast Oscillations at the Interface Between Normal and Epileptic Brain -- 7. Is There Such a Thing as "Generalized" Epilepsy? -- Part II. Synaptic Plasticity -- 8. Are There Really "Epileptogenic" Mechanisms or Only Corruptions of "Normal" Plasticity? -- 9. When and How Do Seizures Kill Neurons, and Is Cell Death Relevant to Epileptogenesis? -- 10. How Is Homeostatic Plasticity Important in Epilepsy? -- 11. Is Plasticity of GABAergic Mechanisms Relevant to Epileptogenesis? -- 12. Do Structural Changes in GABA Neurons Give Rise to the Epileptic State? -- 13. Does Mossy Fiber Sprouting Give Rise to the Epileptic State? -- 14. Does Brain Inflammation Mediate Pathological Outcomes in Epilepsy? -- 15. Are Changes in Synaptic Function That Underlie Hyperexcitability Responsible for Seizure Activity? -- 16. Does Epilepsy Cause a Reversion to Immature Function? -- 17. Are Alterations in Transmitter Receptor and Ion Channel Expression Responsible for Epilepsies? -- Part III. Models and Methods -- 18. How Do We Make Models That Are Useful in Understanding Partial Epilepsies? -- 19. Aligning Animal Models with Clinical Epilepsy: Where to Begin? -- 20. What Non-neuronal Mechanisms Should Be Studied to Understand Epileptic Seizures? -- 21. What Epilepsy Comorbidities Are Important to Model in the Laboratory? Clinical Perspectives -- 22. Epilepsy Comorbidities: How Can Animal Models Help? -- 23. What New Modeling Approaches Will Help Us Identify Promising Drug Treatments? -- 24. What Are the Arguments For and Against Rational Therapy for Epilepsy? -- 25. How Can Advances in Epilepsy Genetics Lead to Better Treatments and Cures? -- 26. How Might Novel Technologies Such as Optogenetics Lead to Better Treatments in Epilepsy?
Format
e-Book
Location
Online
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Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Cardiology. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2021.
Pamphlet Number
0006
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Telemetry is a way of recording your heart’s rate and rhythm. A transmitter is used to send this information to a monitor at the nurses’ station. The recording happens while you are awake as well as while you are asleep. This pamphlet answers questions such as why telemetry is done, where and how it is done, and what to do if you have any problems. The French version of this pamphlet 1893, "Télésurveillance", is also available.
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. QEII. Cardiology
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2021
Format
Pamphlet
Language
English
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Telemetry
Monitoring, physiologic - methods
Subjects (LCSH)
Telemetering transmitters
Heart beat
Abstract
Telemetry is a way of recording your heart’s rate and rhythm. A transmitter is used to send this information to a monitor at the nurses’ station. The recording happens while you are awake as well as while you are asleep. This pamphlet answers questions such as why telemetry is done, where and how it is done, and what to do if you have any problems. The French version of this pamphlet 1893, "Télésurveillance", is also available.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Cardiology, QEII
Pamphlet Number
0006
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Télésurveillance

https://libcat.nshealth.ca/en/permalink/chpams36452
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cardiology. Halifax, NS: Nova Scotia Health Authority , 2018.
Pamphlet Number
1893
Available Online
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La télésurveillance est une façon d’enregistrer votre fréquence et votre rythme cardiaques. Un transmetteur est utilisé pour envoyer cette information à un écran de contrôle au poste de soins infirmiers. L’enregistrement a lieu quand vous êtes éveillé et durant votre sommeil. La présente brochure répond aux questions suivantes : pourquoi utilise-t-on la télésurveillance, comment procède-t-on et quoi faire en cas de problèmes. ; This pamphlet is a French translation of "Telemetry" pamphlet 0006.…
Available Online
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Corporate Author
Nova Scotia Health Authority. Cardiology
Alternate Title
Telemetry
Place of Publication
Halifax, NS
Publisher
Nova Scotia Health Authority
Date of Publication
2018
Format
Pamphlet
Language
French
Physical Description
1 electronic document ([4] p.) : digital, PDF file
Subjects (MeSH)
Telemetry
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Subjects (LCSH)
Telemetering transmitters
Heart beat
Abstract
La télésurveillance est une façon d’enregistrer votre fréquence et votre rythme cardiaques. Un transmetteur est utilisé pour envoyer cette information à un écran de contrôle au poste de soins infirmiers. L’enregistrement a lieu quand vous êtes éveillé et durant votre sommeil. La présente brochure répond aux questions suivantes : pourquoi utilise-t-on la télésurveillance, comment procède-t-on et quoi faire en cas de problèmes.
This pamphlet is a French translation of "Telemetry" pamphlet 0006. Telemetry is a way of recording your heart’s rate and rhythm. A transmitter is used to send this information to a monitor at the nurses’ station. The recording happens while you are awake as well as while you are asleep. This pamphlet answers questions such as why telemetry is done, how it is done, and what to do if any problems arise.
Responsibility
Prepared by: Cardiology
Pamphlet Number
1893
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